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 Enlightened
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Aug
25
comment detect incomplete 32 bit binary data
You do not have "hexadecimal" in the file; you have binary. Hexadecimal consists of text like 3D0F, which is four characters denoting 16 bits or two bytes. Also note that sizeof (char) is 1 by definition, and it is inappropriate to use it for another reason: the third argument to fread represents the number of elements to read, of the size given by the second argument. sizeof (char) isn't a good way to express the concept of "give me one element".
Aug
22
answered ifstream returning true for files that don't exist
Aug
22
comment Git very first steps
@Makoto A remote repository can help you if you trash your local repository. Also, even if you're not doing anything public doesn't mean you don't have multiple machines. The answer to "how do I get these directories onto the web server" could be partially solved with having an upstream repo accessible to both the web server and the development machine.
Aug
22
revised What does int (*f[])(int*) represent?
Clarification in diagram.
Aug
22
revised What does int (*f[])(int*) represent?
added 1151 characters in body
Aug
22
answered What does int (*f[])(int*) represent?
Aug
21
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
20
revised what defines a recursive function?
added 959 characters in body
Aug
19
answered what defines a recursive function?
Aug
19
comment PS1 command substitution fails when containing newlines on msys bash
It's hard to imagine which a character which follows the closing parenthesis causes that parenthesis to be considered a literal part of the command being substituted, rather than a closing token for command substitution. The parsing must be convoluted, making backward jumps in the stream, or bizarre lookaheads.
Aug
18
comment Berkeley Yacc versus GNU Bison: different tolerance w.r.t trailing tokens
The $end token being fused with the $default action isn't that relevant because EOF is not actually occurring in this situation. The actual lookahead token is, for example, an open parenthesis '('. This doesn't match anything that can be shifted, and a reduction of the given rule (according to Byacc) requires $end and not '('. Bison lets it reduce due to $default, allowing the YYACCEPT; statement to be reached. That is all.
Aug
18
comment Berkeley Yacc versus GNU Bison: different tolerance w.r.t trailing tokens
It's very obvious from Byacc's y.output file that it's looking for $end in the reduction rules for various states, where Bison has $default in the same states. The identifier $end appears only once in the Bison parser, yet numerous times in the Byacc. I.e. recent Byacc is not employing that compression scheme. Maybe historically it did that?
Aug
18
comment Berkeley Yacc versus GNU Bison: different tolerance w.r.t trailing tokens
@EJP Yes. I stopped it by invoking YYACCEPT in the body of a subordinate rule, even though $end hasn't been reached.
Aug
18
comment How can I force the user to enter an integer?
@ElliottFrisch Or, hardball tactics: "If you terminate this program without entering an integer, all your files will be erased".
Aug
17
comment Why do I have to use %ld when referring to the size of an int variable?
@chux That's totally irrational if you know that the type is, say, some built-in arithmetic type, and anything but a gargantuan array.
Aug
16
comment Why do I have to use %ld when referring to the size of an int variable?
@user3528438 If the value of the sizeof expression fits into an unsigned long (i.e. lies within the range [0, ULONG_MAX)), then everything is cool. It doesn't matter if the type size_t itself is wider than unsigned long. This issue is adequately covered in the answer.
Aug
16
answered Why do I have to use %ld when referring to the size of an int variable?
Aug
16
comment Why do I have to use %ld when referring to the size of an int variable?
I like your answer best because it doesn't drag in unnecessary C99 junk; it shows the original, highly portable way to do it, If you know that x is basic type, you can cast its size to int, and use %d, or to unsigned and use %u. Only with arrays, and perhaps very large structures, would you have to worry that the size isn't representable in unsigned int.
Aug
15
revised Message delimitation in TCP communication
added 25 characters in body