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Jan
7
revised Comparing two jumbled / unaligned text files
Simplify handling of `.method` declaration material.
Jan
6
comment Ansi C - programming language book of K&R - header file inclusion
Of course, there are serious disadvantages in using a common header. It is harder to yank a source file and re-use it elsewhere. (Then again, use libraries for re-use instead scavenging pieces of programs! Libraries can internally use the "one header" approach just fine.) It does encourage bad modularity: what are the dependencies? You don't see them. You can write modules that aren't cohesive or loosely coupled quite easily. Everything sees the global space, and so any function can live anywhere. However, this problem is solved by programmers using languages that have no headers!
Jan
6
comment Ansi C - programming language book of K&R - header file inclusion
@Lundin One valid perspective is that C header files are basically a nuisance. That is why the makeheaders tool exists: you just write code and it generates/updates the headers from it as part of the build process. The headers it generates actually duplicate material; foo.c includes foo.h only, and foo.h contains everything that is required by foo.c.
Jan
6
comment Ansi C - programming language book of K&R - header file inclusion
@Lundin That is only an opinion. Fact is that the function names in that header file have external linkage. That is to say, they are global anyway. So there is no harm in making them all known at compile time also! And may actually be beneficial: duplicate incompatible declarations can be spotted at compile time. If graphics.c defines draw and so does lottery.c, it might go undetected until link time (and perhaps not even then) if there is no translation unit which includes both lottery.h and graphics.h. If both draw functions are declared in common.h, that will be caught.
Jan
6
answered Ansi C - programming language book of K&R - header file inclusion
Jan
6
comment union 'punning' structs w/ “common initial sequence”: Why does C (99+), but not C++, stipulate a 'visible declaration of the union type'?
@underscore_d Compiler implementors can dismiss it if they don't plan to actually somehow take advantage of the assumption that two different struct types do not overlap, even if they have the type/name members in the same places. For instance, the program does a->count = 0, but the register-cached value of b->count remains unaffected, even though a and b point to the same memory and count is of the same type at the same offset. If that deep kind of aliasing optimization doesn't happen, then the requirement is implicitly being met and the implementors can ignore it.
Jan
6
comment Is it safe to take the difference of two size_t objects?
If uintptr_t cannot hold any memory size that size_t can hold, I will eat my shorts.
Jan
6
comment Is it safe to take the difference of two size_t objects?
@BenVoigt Right; but that's going to be rare. How common is it for size_t to correspond to unsigned short or unsigned char? Still, valid point. As far as "implementation-defined result" goes, that usage is ingrained into me from ISO C. Everything in this answer applies to C and C++.
Jan
6
comment union 'punning' structs w/ “common initial sequence”: Why does C (99+), but not C++, stipulate a 'visible declaration of the union type'?
@underscore_d The thing is, that it's not actually an allowance but a restriction! From the perspective of the programmer, it's an allowance. But the standard is a set of requirements for implementors (many of which are given in terms of program behavior). The C standard is tighter: it requires implementors to be careful in their optimizations and support that usage. If that code is ported to C++, it has undefined behavior. Valid C that is undefined C++, though not diagnosed in C++, doesn't bode well for C++. Nobody wants new UB concerns when converting C to C++!
Jan
6
answered Is it safe to take the difference of two size_t objects?
Jan
6
comment AWK. Extract root and suffixes
@felipsmartins Moreover, TXR Lisp has real mutable cons cells and lists terminated by the object nil, which is a symbol, and serves as Boolean false. The pattern language is "weird" because the "phrases" in the language like @(collect) and @(end) are basically Lisp syntax (demarcated from literal text by the @ signal character). This is deliberately ironic: we have Algol/Fortran-like syntax (parsed by Yacc-generated code and everything), whose building material isn't keywords, but Lisp pieces! But look, HTML does something similar <tag attribute="whatever"> ordinary text </tag>.
Jan
6
comment union 'punning' structs w/ “common initial sequence”: Why does C (99+), but not C++, stipulate a 'visible declaration of the union type'?
@underscore_d The suspicion had to be right because in what circumstance would we be accessing the member of a union, such that the (complete) declaration of the union is not in scope? The only way that is possible is that we obtain a pointer to that member and pass it out of scope. And that situation is not being ruled out: it is just being made subject to the union type still being in scope. Which must mean that the intent is that the union type informs the translator that the structs are involved in a union (so watch out: pointers to those struct types may be to union members).
Jan
6
comment AWK. Extract root and suffixes
@felipsmartins TXR doesn't just smell of Lisp; it contains a Lisp dialect called TXR Lisp which is embedded in the pattern-based extraction language or used stand-alone. This Lisp dialect is geared toward succinct, fluid data munging, addressing many of the nagging "ergonomic" issues in mainstream Lisp dialects.
Jan
6
answered Comparing two jumbled / unaligned text files
Jan
6
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
6
answered Casting between void * and a pointer to member function
Jan
6
comment Check two arguments in Java, either both not null or both null elegantly
@DavidBullock: When it comes to Booleans, nothing says "either this or that but not both the same" like ... "not both the same"; XOR is just another name for the "not equals" function over Booleans.
Jan
5
comment union 'punning' structs w/ “common initial sequence”: Why does C (99+), but not C++, stipulate a 'visible declaration of the union type'?
@underscore_d That's a lot to hope for: that C++ is more permissive than C in some area.
Jan
5
answered union 'punning' structs w/ “common initial sequence”: Why does C (99+), but not C++, stipulate a 'visible declaration of the union type'?
Jan
5
revised Division in awk using variables
added 652 characters in body