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Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@Marcin: You mean what is the difference between a value and a constant? A constant is a pre-defined symbol in the language, like 0 for integers. A "value" in the sense of Strachey is a mathematical entity. Values of type 'integer' are all the integers. Values of type 'integer -> integer' are all functions from integers to integers (module some technicalities). L-values of type, say 'var[integer]', are all the abstract locations that can hold integers.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@chrisdomain: On the other hand, I would heartily agree with you that using side-effecting "expressions" like x++ is a misguided practice. What you gain in terms of convenience is trivial. But, what you lose in terms of equational reasoning (or even other forms of logical reasoning) is considerable. If you ever see any of my papers, you will find me using imperative languages where expressions don't have side effects, such as Reynolds's Idealized Algol. In fact, read-only expressions represent a favorite research problem of mine. Pity that Haskell doesn't have such things!
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@chrisdomain: Moreover, very few people would want to be referential transparency-purists so as to banish such staging operators. Those operators are extremely useful. Programming without them by doing staging manually would be tedious, error-prone and ugly. And, doing staging manually wouldn't buy you any more equational reasoning than what you had earlier. So, prohibiting good programming devices in the purist pursuit of equational reasoning would be like cutting off your nose to spite your face.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@chrisdornan: Sorry for my first comment above. I myself had difficulty making out what I was trying to say in the first two sentences :-( But, here is an explanation. Consider a two-level or multi-level staging calculus. Each staging operator is referentially opaque. It is in fact, a quotation operator. However, you can do equational reasoning within each stage perfectly fine. So, each referentially opaque operator set up boundaries for equational reasoning. But you still have equational reasoning within those boundaries.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@Marcin: Having L-values as first-class values does not mean that there are constants of that kind, does it? If there are constants of that kind, I would appreciate pointers to the literature.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@DanielPratt: If side-effect-freedom is what functional programmers want to mean, then why do they call it "referential transparency"? They can just call it "side-effect-freedom", which is a perfectly clear idea. Nobody on will need to ask on stackexchange what "side-effect-freedom" means. Where is the need to purloin grandiose classical terms that nobody seems to understand?
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@DanielPratt: Yes, I did say that the classical definition is not particularly relevant to programming languages today (since their semantic issues have been sorted out in the 60's). But the new definition hasn't been stated anywhere, except on Wikipedia and StackExchange pages and they don't cite any sources either. At a minimum, a definition has to appear in a refereed publication so that we know that the test of rigour has been met and then we can take it seriously.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@Marcin. I am sorry, but I don't understand what point you are making. Notice that I never said anything about "first-class values" in my answer or in the discussion.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@DanielPratt: I think I am open to terms changing meaning. But I wish somebody sets down clearly what has changed, why it has changed, what the relationship is to the old meaning, and what are the consequences of the new meaning. It would also be useful to know how and when the change has been made.
Aug
1
revised What is referential transparency?
Minor wording change
Aug
1
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
1
revised What is referential transparency?
Changed the paragraph about simplification to one on evaluation
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@applicative: On Word and Object, p. 142, you find a notion of "purely referential" and, by implication, an admission that a context might be partly referential. In a well-intentioned formal language, such partial referentiality can be squeezed out by a good semantics so that all contexts then appear referential. That is what I take Strachey to have done. You will perhaps benefit from actually reading his paper, if you are really interested in this topic.
Aug
1
comment What is referential transparency?
@applicative: That is not what I normally mean by use/mention confusion. But never mind. So, your belief is that functional programmers know what terms mean as denotations, but prefer to talk about those denotations as if they were terms? If so, what do they think is the denotation of "x++" in C? What is supposed to be its "value"? And, why do they say that they can't replace "x++" by its "value"?
Jul
31
revised What is referential transparency?
changed "same concept" to "same entity", as some people seem picky about it!
Jul
31
comment What is referential transparency?
@applicative: I understand that you find an injustice, as you say. But I don't understand why. This is not a "use/mention confusion". If anybody talks about replacing a term by a "value", it immediately implies that the "value" itself is a term. But, the "values" that Frege etc. talk about (using their own terminology) are not terms. So, there is a fundamental type mismatch. It cannot be squared. If you can square it, then go ahead and add your own answer to the original question. That is how this forum works!
Jul
31
comment What is referential transparency?
@pelotom: That is well put. "Once you've fully nailed down the denotational semantics of a language, it can't help but be referentially transparent." Strachey was quite clear that a particular way of defining the semantics, way back in the 60's, was not referentially transparent. Once he found a referentially transparent semantics, i.e., a proper denotational semantics, the problem was solved!
Jul
31
comment What is referential transparency?
@applicative: You are quite right that 'concept' wasn't a good term in my first answer. I felt uneasy about using it because Quine is quite particular that 'concepts' are incoherent. But my English fails me in coming up with a better term. 'Entity', perhaps?
Jul
31
comment What is referential transparency?
@sclv It does not particularly matter what the "within" values are. The point is that functional programmers seem to want all "values" to be within the language. For example, when they say "x++ evaluates to 2, but you can't replace x++ by 2" or some such equivalent complaint, they are limiting their imagination of what 'x++' can be. The idea that 'x++' could be an abstract state transformer doesn't seem to occur to them. If it did, they would see right away that 'x++' as a state transformer is quite different from 2. No surprise that you can't replace it.
Jul
31
comment What is referential transparency?
@applicative: Why don't L-values have a direct representation in the syntax of the language? Because they don't need to. The programmer says "I want a new L-value", and the system gives her one. She calls it 'x' and moves on. It would be a terrible idea to have constants representing L-values because they would tie you down to particular memory layouts and force you to do your own memory management. A high-level programming language is meant to liberate you from such details.