11 reputation
3
bio website
location Turin, Italy
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 2 days ago

Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
The Gene object is composed of several "fields": chrom, symbol, start, stop, entrezId. there might be many genes with the same chrom but with different symbol; several genes have the same chrom and the same symbol but different start point. and I don't get your less than itself...
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@AlessandroTeruzzi thanks for pointing it out, but no important variables removed from headers. Anyway I recompiled the whole application. Concerning memory alignment, how can I be sure memory is properly aligned after thousands of iterations? the point is, I use mostly stl containers, which should guarantee a proper alignment when storing their objects. In this specific situation, a string is transformed into a const char* and passed by value to a function. and this is repeated quite many times. and then all of sudden it crashes!
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@jasal, I edited my question with some more details concerning the comparing function and the context where it is used. chrom is defined ad std::string chrom and is a member of the class Gene. it is accessed in three ways: a trivial getter, a trivial setter and the comparing function above. and NO, at the moment the code is plain sequential code
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
I edited my question with some more details. Concerning the strict weak ordering relation, what are the consequences of not using a proper comparing function? I searched through the c++ documentation but nothing is specified
Jun
11
awarded  Editor
Jun
11
revised c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
added 3946 characters in body
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
I understand your point but the ordering produced satisfies my requirements. For instance, if it has to compare ('chr17','chr17'), it won't satisfy the if statement and will jump to the else, where the == condition is handled. At this point, as you correctly grasped, the entrez_IDs are checked because they CAN be equal; if I only check for start1 < start2 when chr1 == chr2 I do not get the ordering I desire. I'm gonna edit the question adding more details
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@Survaf93 actually, every time I use the above function, a simply transform a std::string to a const char* using the function c_str(), which in turn returns a const pointer to null-terminated contents
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@jasal l and r are incremented after evaluating their content; the range check is with the while(*l && *r), checking the elements are not NULL. chrom is a member variable of the class Gene, and nothing is deallocated before: when the error happens, the l and r values are read from a vetcor of Gene through an iterator
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@Kabulan0lak specifically, in the compareChar function there is no free at all. gonna try fix it and test if it makes any difference.
Jun
11
comment c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
@Cheersandhth.-Alf std::string::compare does not produce a lexicographical order of strings (in which chr2 comes before chr17), that's the reason for a custom function. The compare is called twice because I need that double check for the chrom fields to be equals while the others differ. Also, there is the possibility of a comparison which yields > 0, which I don't really need.
Jun
11
asked c++ string assigned to const char* causes address out of bounds at the n-th iteration
Apr
19
comment c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
Another option, which is the one I've been using, is to return a new MyClass() object with default values (the constructor is actually more detailed than the one in the snippet above). In this way I'll have the chance to later wipe out the vector. in fact, I feel it is not an elegant programming solution at all, but it's the one I've found so far
Apr
19
comment c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
@arayq2 I do understand your point. But the fact is, the searched-by-ID value may not exist, in which case either I throw and handle exceptions, or I just return a NULL pointer. As far as I know, there is no way to return a NULL reference in C++
Apr
18
awarded  Commentator
Apr
18
comment c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
@arayq2 Just dealing with that issue. I think I better change to MyClass *getByID(int id) and return NULL
Apr
18
comment c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
@arayq2 what do you mean? shall I move it outside the class and make it global? I actually thought about this, but I could not see any improvement in doing that. Why would you suggest it?
Apr
18
comment c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
actually, objID doesn't act as a key since it is not unique. Also, most of the operations on the list's objects will deal with the start and stop fields: Searching and ordering the list according to these two fields, mostly. Thus I believe a vector would be the easiest choice. But I might be wrong
Apr
18
asked c++ Access elements of an object in a vector of objects
Jan
24
comment Linux environment variable set but not used
I first exported, then logged out and logged in, and it is there now. Kind of easy! thanks