24,539 reputation
33887
bio website google.com/+DanielPryden
location Silicon Valley
age 31
visits member for 5 years, 9 months
seen 2 hours ago

I started tinkering with computers at the age of 6. These days, I'm a senior software engineer at Google, currently working on Java application server infrastructure.

Besides being fluent in English and American Sign Language, I know too many programming languages to count. Lately I've primarily been using Java, plus some odds and ends of Python, C++, and JavaScript. I enjoy C#, even though nowadays I don't get many chances to use it. I'm also a big fan of Haskell and Scala, although I haven't had a chance to use either of them in a large-scale project yet.

In my spare time, I play guitar and read voraciously, including science fiction and books on computing. I'm also a volunteer minister for the deaf, teaching Bible studies in American Sign Language.

Standard disclaimer: my opinions are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.


Oct
8
comment How to intersect two polygons?
Most algorithms to do what you describe rely on the winding rule to make it possible, so your first step should probably be to connect all the edges into an ordered set of points with known winding (clockwise is most common, but I've seen counterclockwise as well). Once you have an ordered set of points, you can use dot products and the right-hand rule to quickly (well in O(m*n)) find if any point from polygon A is inside polygon B. This is a necessary precondition to determine what kind of output geometry you can get.
Oct
8
comment How to intersect two polygons?
+1 for this. I was looking for a .NET port of JTS, and this looks like it will fit the bill.
Oct
8
comment Generics: Type as variable?
@Juha: You are correct. @Ryan: Your statement would be correct if we were talking about C#, but it is incorrect, because we are talking about Java.
Oct
8
answered Generics: Type as variable?
Oct
7
answered Need a workaround: Python's select.select() doesn't work with subprocess' stdout?
Oct
7
comment How to remove these duplicates in a list (python)
This is pretty much the same as Ian Clelland's answer above, except it doesn't reverse the list first. Saving the reverse is faster, but doing the link in d test for every element seems like it might be slower than simply overwriting. In any case, the speed difference is probably lost in the noise, so it really depends on what style you prefer.
Oct
7
comment How to remove these duplicates in a list (python)
Scratch that. reversed() of a list will be O(n), due to copying (at least in Python 2.x). It still seems like overall performance should be O(n) though, which should be faster than sorting the list.
Oct
7
comment How to remove these duplicates in a list (python)
BTW, +1 for using a dict. Assuming you have a real list (not just any iterable), reversed() should be O(1), building the dict should be O(n), and extracting the values should be O(n). So this seems like it should be the fastest way, especially for a large list.
Oct
7
comment How to remove these duplicates in a list (python)
You have an extra, unneeded pair of parentheses -- the parentheses for dict() are good enough, you don't need another set to introduce the generator expression. Also, you don't need parentheses around the tuple either, although it's probably a good idea.
Oct
7
comment How to remove these duplicates in a list (python)
I like this approach. One thing I would do is use for item in sorted(biglist, key=lambda elt: elt['link']) instead of sorting the biglist in place. It will (temporarily) use more memory (because of copying the biglist), but depending on your application you may not want to mutate a big data object like that.
Oct
7
comment Assign the 'onmouseover' event handler
Beat me to it as well. Yes, this is the right answer.
Oct
7
answered Assign the 'onmouseover' event handler
Oct
7
comment Newbie needs to know how to parse a whole text group like this
I think you need to add more details on the syntax of the language you are trying to parse. Where are braces required? It appears that the sequence -- introduces a comment -- is that true? It looks like you may be able to parse this with some kind of finite state automaton (e.g. regex), but depending on the rules of the language you may need a more complex lexer.
Oct
7
comment In SQL Server 2008, what default date should I use if I don't want it to be null?
Also, unless your application is tied to a given locale and will never be used elsewhere, it is almost always better to use GetUtcDate() than GetDate(). As soon as you start dealing with more than one timezone, storing dates in anybody's local time becomes a very bad idea.
Oct
7
answered In SQL Server 2008, what default date should I use if I don't want it to be null?
Oct
7
comment C++ How to convert string to char*
strdup(line.c_str()) would probably be better.
Oct
7
revised Merge result of two queries in SQL Server
More reformatting of SQL code
Oct
7
comment Cannot implicitly convert type void to IList<int>
@homestead & Reed Copsey: Yup, sorry about that. Simple solution is just to use a temporary variable of type List<int>. See my edit for one possible solution.
Oct
7
revised Cannot implicitly convert type void to IList<int>
Updated in response to comments
Oct
7
answered Cannot implicitly convert type void to IList<int>