23,357 reputation
33684
bio website google.com/+DanielPryden
location Silicon Valley
age 31
visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen 12 hours ago

I started tinkering with computers at the age of 6. These days, I'm a senior software engineer at Google, currently working on Java application server infrastructure.

Besides being fluent in English and American Sign Language, I know too many programming languages to count. Lately I've primarily been using Java, plus some odds and ends of Python, C++, and JavaScript. I enjoy C#, even though nowadays I don't get many chances to use it. I'm also a big fan of Haskell and Scala, although I haven't had a chance to use either of them in a large-scale project yet.

In my spare time, I play guitar and read voraciously, including science fiction and books on computing. I'm also a volunteer minister for the deaf, teaching Bible studies in American Sign Language.

Standard disclaimer: my opinions are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.


Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
14
comment Does java version “1.6.0_65” equivocate to java 6?
Wikipedia has a fairly thorough article on Java version history.
Aug
9
awarded  Guru
Aug
9
comment Getting integer in HashMap without Iterating
+1 to using a Multimap. Depending on the use case, Multimaps.invertFrom and/or ImmutableMultimap.inverse() may also be useful.
Aug
9
revised Getting integer in HashMap without Iterating
expanded answer to respond to comment
Aug
9
answered Getting integer in HashMap without Iterating
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
You're still creating the Random instance in a loop, though. If you want a general review of your code, there's also codereview.stackexchange.com you could ask. The comments are getting long here, so you should open a new question if you want further assistance.
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
That's how I read the OP's requirement about "excluding 5" in the question.
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
Jeff Atwood also has a couple of blog posts relevant to this: Shuffling and The Danger of Naïveté.
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
@KickButtowski: I'm on a tablet at the moment, so typing code is annoyingly tedious. And there are plenty of examples of this kind of thing on the linked duplicate question, so there's no point in rehashing those here (pardon the pun). If you're having trouble understanding the answers on the other question, you can also always ask a new question for more clarification.
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
@KickButtowski: LinkedHashSet is better, now the order is actually random (or at least as random as your input entropy allows). But collisions will still cause the set to not hold every element. You need to keep iterating until the set has the size you want.
Aug
3
comment don't random number that are being random before
HashSet iterates in an implementation-defined order, which will destroy the entropy Random gives you in the first place.
Aug
1
comment Why do finalizers have a “severe performance penalty”?
@Raedwald: Right. For example, the OpenJDK implementation of FileOutputStream has a finalizer, which you can see by looking at the OpenJDK source. (I'm not able to find anything that requires the standard library implementation to use finalizers, though.) So in practice, objects that are otherwise eligible for GC but that are still pending finalization are just promoted to the next older generation (survivor space or tenured) while the finalizer is queued to run. But the actual memory won't be reclaimed until the next time that next older generation is collected.
Jul
31
comment Confusing output from String.split
The weirdness of String.split is exactly why the Guava library has Splitter, as explained in the Guava documentation
Jul
26
comment Multiple values for a given variable
@mixingbuddha: You just need to make a dictionary where the keys are (old_supervisor, new_supervisor) tuples. Here's a simple example I just whipped up: gist.github.com/anonymous/22f3b363d834e2bfa818
Jul
24
comment PyInstaller-built Windows EXE fails with multiprocessing
The underlying issue is that Windows doesn't support the fork() primitive the way Unix does, and multiprocessing is designed around the Unix paradigm. It works on Windows, but it works differently, and therein lies the rub. Further reading: Python multiprocessing is different under Linux and Windows; Multiprocessing on Windows breaks.
Jul
17
comment How can I open another command line application in Linux from a Java program?
@grimetime: if you're stuck on Java 6, you could always use JNI to do a fork() in native code. Of course, then you have to deal with the pain of pulling in a platform-specific JNI dependency.
Jul
16
answered How can I open another command line application in Linux from a Java program?
Jul
15
comment How to free memory in Java?
@VenomVendor: Thanks for the comment. I've updated the links.
Jul
15
revised How to free memory in Java?
Fixed stale links