Reputation
25,831
Next tag badge:
446/400 score
77/80 answers
Badges
3 41 92
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~2.1m people reached

Apr
14
comment Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
@roux69: The Selenium angle makes this more interesting -- there may be a better solution there that I don't know about. So it might be worth opening a separate question for that so it gets more attention.
Apr
14
comment Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
@LocHa: Are you seriously arguing that your public API surface should be 1000 different methods? If you have that many methods, even reflection will be unwieldy since you will need to encode the logic to select which method to call. Without an API to give semantic meaning to methods, there's no way you can a priori know what method to call. Sure, you can build "duck typed" APIs where you look for a method with a particular name or signature (cf. JUnit 3) but if you're doing that you're much better off with annotations instead. Your argument (and downvote) here makes no sense.
Apr
14
comment Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
@LocHa: If you have 1000 subclasses, I would hope that you can define an API that's common to all of them. (Since otherwise that means that you have 1000 special snowflake web pages, which means that your site is already an unmaintainable mess.) But now we've veered into the topic of API design -- perhaps you should open a new question about that?
Apr
14
answered Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
Apr
14
comment Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
+1 for "this is most likely the wrong solution to the problem". It would probably be worthwhile to expand on the second half of your answer, since I think that's really the right answer for the OP.
Apr
14
comment Using concrete class from a abstract type variable
@roux69: Your code samples aren't valid Java. In this case, I think everyone here is able to figure out what you mean, but it's better to use code examples that actually demonstrate your problem. See stackoverflow.com/help/mcve for more information.
Apr
11
comment Creating a memory leak with Java
@igaurav: Regarding your edit to this answer, please see the discussion at meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/289814
Apr
10
revised Creating a memory leak with Java
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
10
revised Creating a memory leak with Java
Adding lots more lines to reclaim CW majority authorship. See http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/65541
Apr
10
revised Creating a memory leak with Java
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
10
revised Creating a memory leak with Java
Adding more text to the answer in an attempt to reclaim the credit for this answer. See discussion on meta: http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/289814/another-user-merged-my-code-from-github-into-my-answer-and-now-my-name-isnt-att
Apr
9
awarded  Quorum
Apr
9
revised Creating a memory leak with Java
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
2
comment Why do garbage collectors wait before deallocating?
@supercat: I don't know of any collectors that work like you describe, but it's fairly common in a generational GC to have multiple younggen or scavenger spaces. See also Java 7's G1 collector, which while not quite the same, has a similar concept.
Apr
2
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
29
comment Java: Return in a for loop
@ajb: If you want a Java-like language, C# also has generators (yield return). The Wikipedia page Generator (computer programming) lists examples in several common languages.
Mar
29
comment Is there a more efficient alternative to nesting an if statement within a for loop in C# when dealing with large numbers of iterations?
@benlisquare: Aside from eliding the if check entirely, there's nothing else here that would make a substantial difference in the runtime. If you need to loop over all the elements, then that's O(n) and you're not going to get any more efficient than that (asymptotically speaking). The best way to optimize this kind of code is to attack the problem differently: do you care more about total CPU time, or simply user-visible latency? If the latter, perhaps a parallel algorithm is what you're looking for.
Mar
29
answered Java: Return in a for loop
Mar
29
comment Is there a more efficient alternative to nesting an if statement within a for loop in C# when dealing with large numbers of iterations?
There's no such thing as an "if loop" -- if statements don't loop. As it stands, your question doesn't show any nested loops at all.