21,393 reputation
13271
bio website barzilay.org
location Massachusetts
age 44
visits member for 5 years, 1 month
seen Aug 13 at 19:36

Aug
13
answered Racket how to define a recursive generator like Python?
Aug
13
comment Racket how to define a recursive generator like Python?
One problem with this answer is that subsets is a function that should only be used inside of a generator. IOW, calling it directly won't make you happy.
Jul
1
comment How to get rid of duplicates in a list, but keep the order
You need to use the regular language, not the student languages.
Jun
25
awarded  Yearling
May
30
answered Why people say “emacs is good for writing lisp program because it's written in emacs lisp”?
May
27
awarded  Enlightened
May
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
5
comment How to make a “define” that accepts string in the first parameter in SISC Scheme?
@FelipeMicaroniLalli: Well, something like defining new functions for a new data type is certainly possible, and very different from uses that can do with a hash table. However, they cannot be done with a plain syntax-rules if the macro needs to create new names. The thing is that in SRFI 9 you don't need to create new names -- that's the reason for specifying the accessor names in the new record definition, and in fact that's done intentionally, so it is possible to define it with simple syntax-rules macros.
May
4
awarded  Nice Answer
May
3
comment How to make a “define” that accepts string in the first parameter in SISC Scheme?
@uselpa: all you get, with either version, is to write (dyndef "foo" 1) instead of (def foo 1); the string must be there, literally, in the macro use -- and therefore it is no more dynamic than a regular define. See the explanation in my (non-)answer.
May
3
answered How to make a “define” that accepts string in the first parameter in SISC Scheme?
May
3
comment How to make a “define” that accepts string in the first parameter in SISC Scheme?
Didn't anyone notice that neither of these solutions is a good one since they're both not dynamic??
Apr
6
answered Could someone explain call/cc in simple words?
Feb
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
11
awarded  Caucus
Jan
31
comment Curry-Skip Scheme
OTOH, the OP would most likely say that this is some homework and therefore optimizations are not a consideration -- and that is exactly why your advice is bogus: it promotes micro-optimizations where you should be thinking about the overall problem and try to get the simplest code. I liked your answer since it was a demonstration of manipulating closures as values, but with the outside version even that is easy to lose. This is why I firmly stand behind the bogos-advice claim.
Jan
31
comment Curry-Skip Scheme
You've got that completely off... Yes, closure creation takes a (very small) amount of time, but no -- not always, since a good compiler would eliminate the cost for small or for some identifiable forms; now, given that a function like that would normally be a bit faster with the inside version for small values and given that small values are most likely going to be more common, then from an optimization POV, you should prefer optimizing that case (hence using the inside version) since overall you'd win.
Jan
30
comment Curry-Skip Scheme
no, that's still wrong. Assuming a reasonable compiler, both would result in a very similar code and the same speed. The only thing that is a tiny difference is doing the subtraction in or out of the function, but even that would be lifted by a good compiler anyway. I don't know which implementation you've used, but by the obnoxious amount of allocation, it's most likely not compiling. (Petite? -- which is not compiling in its free version as a matter of principle.) I used Racket 5.3.6, and you can see that the outside version is slightly slower: tmp.barzilay.org/sc.rkt
Jan
29
comment Curry-Skip Scheme
Your definition is a nice contrast to the other one, but downvoted because the emphasized advice to compute the n-1 case outside is completely bogus.
Jan
14
comment How can you rewrite “begin” in Scheme?
Here's another bad one: (let ((x 1)) (list x (define x (+ x 1)) x))