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comment handling multiple clients using select
A single socket can be bound to a single port (maybe automatically assigned) and, either to all local IPs or to a single one. If you need more, create more sockets. Then, use the only select or, better, poll for the whole descriptor set, both for send and receive. You don't have thousands of descriptors to separate them into different sets. On successful return from select/poll, analyze each descriptor readiness and perform corresponding actions (read/write). Remove useless FD_ISSET calls or really use their return values. That's enough for first iteration.
Dec
2
comment telnet end of message
It simply writes data to stdout.:) Well, not so simply - it converts network CRLF line terminators to local LF ones. OTOH it's event-driven with select() around reading two descriptors - stdin (0) and network one. If some data are available to read, it reads, converts and passes to opposite side output buffers. If there is something in output buffers, it adds waiting to write a corresponding descriptor, and, if it can, writes. That's all if the telnet protocol specifics aren't applied.
Dec
2
comment Does TCP socket receive data in the same way as it was sent?
These examples were for FreeBSD but work under Linux. Sorry, no Windows experience.
Dec
1
comment telnet end of message
Please explain, why do you say telnet "made decision NOT to print first arrived fragment" if your strace output explicitly says telnet did print the fragment?
Dec
1
comment Does TCP socket receive data in the same way as it was sent?
@user1884325 github.com/netch80/micro/tree/master/tests/sctp some working examples.
Nov
30
answered pcap_open_live unable to open eth0 hexinject
Nov
30
comment handling multiple clients using select
BTW would you like switching to poll() instead of select()? It's easier to understand and use in most cases.
Nov
30
comment handling multiple clients using select
tv_sec can't be float; setting 0.7 to it results in 0, so, you effectively wait for 0.5 seconds in 1st select() and unknown time (due to chance timeout is overwritten) in 2nd and following ones.
Nov
30
comment handling multiple clients using select
First, there is one obvious discrepancy: sequence of two select()s for the same descriptor sets. If select() returns non-zero, sets are replaced with the only ready descriptors. Second, timeout for select can be updated, so you shall fill it again before each call. Third, better bzero() the whole sockaddr_in before filling with values, than only sin_zero. Fourth, there are uses of FD_ISSET without analyzing return value. Please fix all this and retry.
Nov
30
comment Thread and socket
I guess one can't help you because doesn't know what the beast is this TCPThread. There is no such class in the standard library. If it is emulated after BaseHTTPServer style, then serve_forever() is blocking by design and so shall be called in a separate thread. If you don't agree, show the implementation of classes you used here.
Nov
30
comment telnet end of message
telnet itself doesn't check any FTP response code. If you use telnet to chat with FTP server, this is a human's responsibility. That's why you couldn't found how checking response code is implemented - the proper answer is "no way, it isn't". For such check you should read FTP client source code, not telnet one.
Nov
30
answered Python 3.4 Sockets sendall function
Nov
30
comment What happen when we receive a truncated DNS response?
Are you sure the response is really the same as request? DNS packet structure is firm and the same fields are in identical places. With printing binary data as characters you will likely miss principal details. Instead, you should do basic decoding of packet structure and print numerically at least: flags, rcode, qdcount, ancount, aucount, adcount.
Nov
30
answered Get request python webserver
Nov
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answered telnet end of message
Nov
29
answered VOIP on my Android Application
Nov
29
comment Does TCP socket receive data in the same way as it was sent?
TCP guarantees that if some octets are received, then these octets are received without errors (as inserts, deletes or replaces), no more. If you need message boundaries preserving, consider switching to SCTP, it's much easier to use.
Nov
29
answered How recv() function works when looping?
Nov
29
answered How to finish a socket file transfer in Python?