8,707 reputation
21726
bio website wrong.net
location Redmond, WA
age 42
visits member for 5 years, 6 months
seen Nov 28 '10 at 5:06

Nov
16
comment Service layer interdependency
"Dependency injection is something you should avoid as it increases coupling and complexity for an illusion of flexibility." What?
Nov
11
comment what are the different type of design patterns?
There are many strong opinions about singletons. Many of those opinions boil down to "They're bad, and just glorified globals." You should at least consider that argument.
Nov
6
comment C# What Layer to start with
This is why I prefer a kind of outside-in approach. Define the layers by using them, and then make the API you wish existed work.
Oct
23
comment Are .net delegates real objects?
@WeNeedAnswers: Fine, then, as I said in my answer - define "object."
Oct
23
comment Are .net delegates real objects?
Your views on objects reflects more upon your understanding of objects than it does on objects themselves. You've made up your mind what objects are, and it's frankly a relatively shallow understanding. You may wish to research the Actor model, and consider objects-as-Actors as a design paradigm. In such a model, objects would never have publicly accessible state since there's no concept of 'return values' in the Actor model (at least, between Actors). Consider as well that some developers consider getters and setters to break encapsulation, and be poor OO design.
Oct
16
comment int a; …; (a == a) fails?
@MBZ: Comparing an unitialized int to itself is undefined behavior. They could compare as equal, they could compare as unequal. They could format your hard drive. They could summon Cthulhu. Any use of undefined behavior is, inherently, a bug. Undefined behavior never works - it only seems to work.
Oct
8
comment Interface implementation overrides, etc
@Timwi: There's a place for everything. In general, though, I recommend against interfaces that are just the members of a class that are then 'lifted' into an interface. They're rarely useful. The examples that you gave happen to be some of the cases that are useful. I'd also argue that while IComparer and IComponent are in fact based on nouns, they really represent capabilities rather than a specific type.
Oct
8
comment Interface implementation overrides, etc
While it's an interesting question, I'd recommend not having 'noun' interfaces. Instead, have interfaces that describe the capabilities of an object - such as ITastable.
Oct
7
comment Why am I getting these errors in C#?
Missing the 'homework' tag.
Sep
30
comment How to use Dependency Injection without breaking encapsulation?
I disagree. If you think of interfaces as definitions of messages that can be sent, holding a reference to an interface, and calling it, looks a lot like sending a message. In that case, the behavior of an object can be defined as "given these input messages, expect these output messages." What the receiver of the message does is not the responsibility of the sender.
Sep
27
comment How do you think through and predict the output of a threading question like this?
No, I'd fix the code. I'm pretty sure the answer is A, C here, and the unlocked gap between reading the current value of x and modifying it is the reason. And yes, I understand the point of the exercise. But if people get used to seeing multithreading code like this, my fear would be that they would think that this is an appropriate way to write it, and use the 'tricks' they found in code like this. If junior devs are looking at bad code as an exercise, I really want them to be aware that it's bad code up front.
Sep
27
comment How do you think through and predict the output of a threading question like this?
The real answer to this question is that this is horrible, horrible multithreaded coding and anybody producing code like this in a production environment should not only be immediately fired, but in fact banned from ever programming again.
Sep
25
comment Revision control for windows, besides Git
... and it has pretty good Windows support
Sep
20
comment What does const denote here?
@Jonathan Grynspan: Not a problem - thank you for the educational addition :) Though, to be fair, const methods really should be side-effect free...
Sep
19
comment What does const denote here?
@Jonathan Grynspan: You are absolutely correct. i didn't get into that simply to avoid complicating the answer further.
Sep
19
comment Object Oriented style programming for interaction between objects
@stakx: It's a simplified example to show object interaction. The primary difference between this option and Option B are that in Option B, there is still a higher level procedure manipulating John and Betty, and acting as an intermediary. In this option, John and Betty are directly interacting, without needing an intermediary at all. Real code for this would also include John deducting his $5, and either committing or rolling back when Betty successfully received it - something like the case described here: eaipatterns.com/ramblings/18_starbucks.html
Aug
17
comment How to implement singleton with strategies?
While I agree that he doesn't actually want a Singleton, a combination of dependency injection and factories for the classes that need the ImageDownloader would be better than static factories.
Aug
12
comment Strongly-typed integers
@Merlyn: That was just a class I created. I'm considering writing some classes like that (possibly one for each primitive type) and CodePlexing them.
Aug
12
comment Strongly-typed integers
@Merlyn: I think I've done similar, with a ConstrainedValue<T> type.
Aug
12
comment Strongly-typed integers
It probably makes sense to do the implicit cast back to int. But either way, I'd recommend not doing both.