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Jun
22
asked RestSharp Serialize JSON Array to request parameter
Jun
18
comment MongoDB and using DBRef with Spatial Data
The geometries are about 100 bytes per, so it's not feasible for them replicated in a de-normalized way. Together just the geometry collection runs 10GB, so without a join it would be 350400 GB extra space needed.
Jun
17
comment Projection with single child object
The issue is that I wasn't quoting the field name
Jun
17
accepted Projection with single child object
Jun
17
asked Projection with single child object
Jun
12
revised MongoDB and using DBRef with Spatial Data
added 133 characters in body
Jun
12
revised MongoDB and using DBRef with Spatial Data
added 2 characters in body
Jun
12
asked MongoDB and using DBRef with Spatial Data
Jun
12
comment Big data with spatial queries/indexing
I was unable to really cluster by spatial locality, it's a bit of a hard problem with GSI right now. Once method would be binning the data into buckets based on z-order curve : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z-order_curve . Right now we are using a raid-5 with 4 HDD for read speed, but since clustering is hard we may want to try on a SSD but the only SSD we have is non-enterprise SQL server so its not enough room (limited to 10GB a table). Long story short, at 2 billion records searches I got it to 12 seconds...we need 1 second... Giving up for now...
Jun
12
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
11
comment Cluster on a spatial index
The geometry is stored with SRID 3857 so it is pre-projected for use in mapping. Technically this is geography but there is more overhead to storing as geography then geometry and for our use-case storing as geometry and converting to geography when we need it is good for us. Just wanted to point that out, but I will considering other solutions but forcing the optimizer to use the spatial index performs as I expected, the geometry table has 98409 logical reads.
Jun
11
comment Cluster on a spatial index
If by somehow I can cluster on something say like, zipcodes, I would best the number of page reads it has to do is far less, more like 1-100. I dont have zipcodes to these geometries...once option for a solution would be some type of zipcode to long/lat lookup, or something of that nature.
Jun
11
comment Cluster on a spatial index
In this case it is making a smart move because the geometry table is clustered randomly (because I clustered on a auto increment key). There are 100 million geometries and it finds 2,000 results. These 2,000 results probably belong to close to 2,000 separate pages because the crap clustering. My assumption is that SQL server realized while the spatial index will do a better job of filtering, its too unclustered and opts for using a filter that not as good, but more clustered.
Jun
11
comment Cluster on a spatial index
Yeah I cluster on a arbitrary key now and added my spatial index. The spatial index is ignored by SQL server, because it would rather first use a different cluster PK from a table being JOINed and then just do a scan of the PK on my geo table (It does this because right now if it did use my spatial index then data would be scattered). If I could find a way to cluster in some of meaningful spatial way I think SQL server would use my spatial index, because the leaf nodes wont be on such unclustered pages.
Jun
10
asked Cluster on a spatial index
Jun
10
comment Big data with spatial queries/indexing
If thats the case, shouldnt I want the cluster to be on spatial location first if the spatial filter will happen first? I am not sure I can use geometry as a FK/PK...ANyways... I foudn this article interesting about using DATE vs Int for date dimensions : made2mentor.com/2011/05/…
Jun
10
comment Big data with spatial queries/indexing
AaronLS you say setup the CL index for the fact table in date, time, link -- I assume because for date queries like the range, you want all pages to be sequential. It seems like the best filter that can be done in is a spatial one, where a typical intersection will cut down from 100 million down to 300,000 or less, which will cut 99.97% of data we are dealing with from the get go if the spatial filtering is applied first. Then instead of doing date ranges on 200 billion records, it is only on 60 million. Compare to if we do date first it will mostly only cut 70-90%.
Jun
10
revised Big data with spatial queries/indexing
edited tags
Jun
9
comment Big data with spatial queries/indexing
Btw, I didn't actually setup foreign keys, they are just drawn for the purposes of connecting the tables on that graph. I don't care about relations, just speed. The factSpeed table is setup with a composite key of all 3 fields. Also not shown is the dimSegments table has a spatial key on the geometry itself, but its 1:30 minutes not even considering geometry... Am i doing something wrong or is SQL server not cut out for big data? My guess is the former
Jun
9
comment Big data with spatial queries/indexing
Not promising performance. Here is the query plan for the SQL you gave: i.imgur.com/NjKYx1h.png It took 1:30 minutes and this is with a fact table with only 5000 geometries of the 100 million i need to support. My schema is: i.imgur.com/VQtEW61.png ..althought I went for an int YYYYMMDD instead of smallint. Was going to compare the differences later on, but if either take more than 1 second then this isn't for me. (It takes just 1 second to scan all 100 million geometries for the boundary shown in the data execution)