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Jan
25
comment Clarification on Exception handling
@Cody: Good reasons to catch and re-throw include restoring a class to a safe state after an exception, improving on an exception produced by Microsoft libraries or third-party code, and hiding implementation details.
Jan
25
comment Clarification on Exception handling
@Cody: As an example, imagine that your library implements user details storage as a text file. Your callers have no interest in your implementation. So you would want to catch the "File not found" exception and throw instead a custom "User details not found" exception.
Jan
25
comment Clarification on Exception handling
@Cody: You should attach the original exception as an InnerException to the new exception so that the detail is available to the caller. Also, exceptions aren't just for exceptional conditions. They can be for usage errors, program errors, or system failures.
Jan
20
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
So your argument is that there's a practical difference between a billion years and a million years? A quote from your OTP link: "However, if a modern so-called CSPRNG is used, it can form the basis for an empirically secure stream cipher."
Jan
20
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
So with an RNG, it takes a billion years to enumerate every state, and with a CSPRNG it takes a million years. The difference is huge, but completely meaningless from any practical viewpoint. When somebody asks for a method to generate an OTP, I think it's perfectly acceptable to supply a method that produces the same practical characteristics as an OTP.
Jan
19
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
CSPRNG outputs are completely unpredictable - i.e. can be used as a real OTP - unless the attacker knows the start conditions. So if you make the assumption that your CSPRNG or RNG aren't compromised, both can be used as a real OTP. There may be a theoretical difference, but only if you assume a compromise.
Jan
18
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
The fundamental security of an OTP is based on having a set of numbers where the sequence is completely unpredictable. Regardless of the source of the numbers (a RNG or a PRNG), the unpredictability of the sequence can be compromised by an attacker with sufficient access. My example above highlights subverting an RNG, there's an academic paper that shows a similar method of subverting CryptGenRandom. Hence my use of the word "guaranteed" - both a RNG (real OTP) and a PNRG (pseudo OTP) have no guarantee of producing an uncompromised sequence of random numbers.
Jan
17
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
There is no such thing as a guaranteed "real OTP". Security is defined only relative to an attack model. For example, a hardware circuit to produce subverted bits can be built on an integrated circuit a few millimeters square. The most sophisticated hardware random number generator can be subverted by placing such a chip anywhere upstream of where the source of randomness is digitised, say in an output driver chip or even in the cable connecting the RNG to the computer.
Jan
15
comment Perfectly random one-time pad for encryption
@Nick: While using a cryptographically-secure PNRG for a one-time pad is not the same as using a true RNG, the two methods are almost identical in strength. It's not called "cryptographically-secure" for nothing. And I like Steve Bellovin's quote: "I've observed that one-time pads are theoretically unbreakable, but practically very weak. By contrast, conventional ciphers are theoretically breakable, but practically strong."
Jan
12
comment How to secure dynamic SQL stored procedure?
Whichever solution you choose, be aware that when you execute dynamic SQL within a stored procedure, that SQL runs by default with the permissions of the stored proc caller. Whereas normal SQL in a stored procedure runs by default with the permissions of the stored proc owner.
Dec
22
comment What is more powefull between a stored procedure and a view?
possible duplicate of SQL-Server Performance: What is faster, a stored procedure or a view?
Dec
8
comment What is your best programmer joke?
@Ethel: if you want to discuss being offended by this joke, then it's male developers who are the target, not female developers. Think about who the joke is portraying as desperate geeks...
Dec
8
comment Common programming mistakes in .Net when handling exceptions?
@Anna: the "correct" way also has issues. For example, rethrow assumes an unhandled exception, which means an undefined situation. But catch causes the Finally blocks below the Catch block to run. In an undefined situation, the code in these Finally blocks could make the problem worse. Also, the code in those Finally blocks will change program state. So any logging won't capture the actual program state when the exception was originally thrown.
Dec
8
comment Is it okay that I sometimes sink my exceptions?
The problem with logging an exception in a catch block is that all the finally clauses are executed between where the exception was thrown and the catch block. Thus the program state has been changed before it can be logged. An alternative is to log in a top-level exception event handler.
Dec
8
comment SQL Server 2008 paging methods?
@David: SQL Server int. You don't think 2^31-1 is big enough?
Dec
7
comment Hiding registry activity
@Viktor: the phone-home is only needed at install-time, not during normal operation. Or do you want to enable everything to be offline, even installation?
Dec
5
comment SQL Server 2008 paging methods?
ROW_NUMBER is known to have performance issues with very large result sets: 4guysfromrolla.com/webtech/042606-1.shtml
Dec
5
comment SQL Server 2008 paging methods?
@Martin: agreed, TOP should work just as well with any version of SQL Server greater tham 2000. I've not tested that, so I just went with the code that I have tested.
Dec
5
comment SQL Server 2008 paging methods?
@ScottE: also, the column used doesn't need to be an incremental id. You can use any column suitable for sorting.
Dec
5
comment SQL Server 2008 paging methods?
@ScottE: id breaks make no difference to this code, because the upper size is the number of rows in the page (not the id number).