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13h
comment UDP Server : select() function is always returning 0
Returning zero after 2 seconds is exactly what select() is expected to do if you pass in a two-second timeval struct. If you don't want it to return after a specified timeout, pass in NULL for the timeval argument. (as for why it doesn't return when server_s has data ready-for-read, see @gmch's answer -- and also note that you should be calling FD_CLR() and FD_SET on each iteration of the loop, not just once at startup)
1d
comment How to remove this kind of switch case?
Why the calls to new and delete? You can simply allocate your Message objects on the stack, which will be more efficient and avoid any chance of a memory leak. (You'll probably need to put curly braces around the case's contents)
1d
comment programming c threaded io
Pawel is right -- you probably won't see much (if any) speedup from multithreading the I/O, because the bottleneck will be your hard drive, which won't go any faster just because multiple threads are using it at once. OTOH, if you want to do the multithreading just as an exercise, you can implement that by setting up a message-passing system (e.g. using dequeues, mutexes, and condition variables or pipes for signaling). E.g. reader thread reads some data, passes it in a message to the modifier thread, which modifies it and passes it in a message to the writer thread, and so on.
1d
comment Would the compiler optimize this expression into a temporary constant rather than resolve it every iteration?
Here's a fun post on why if-statements can be expensive: stackoverflow.com/a/11227902/131930
Sep
19
comment UDP - Multithreaded server is unable to distinguish between an ack msg and a connection msg
Put a command code at the front of your UDP data that indicates what sort of message it is. One byte would probably be sufficient.
Sep
18
comment receive data from multicast socket in linux with lowest latency
"blocking is always expensive" <-- can you explain why, or is that an article of faith?
Sep
18
comment receive data from multicast socket in linux with lowest latency
Btw if you want guaranteed low latency, you might look at Xenomai real time extensions for Linux, as that is what they provide.
Sep
18
comment receive data from multicast socket in linux with lowest latency
It's not clear why you think a blocking recvfrom() call will be very slow. It's true it won't return for a long time if no packets are received, but if/when a packet is received it should return right away. Is it context-switching overhead that you're worried about?
Sep
18
comment QDialog distorted on moving it
Can you include a short example program that demonstrates the problem?
Sep
18
comment Not counting all the coins
My suggestion is that you use cents as your units rather than dollars. That way you won't have to deal with non-integer types.
Sep
17
comment Qt - how to detect line count increase after word wrapping?
@Hossein checking for end-of-line strings might get you a paragraph-count, but a line-count (in the context of a widget with word wrapping enabled) will depend on the width of the widget, and thus can vary even if the text string it is representing hasn't changed.
Sep
16
comment Recursion - Declaring variable in the body or use it as a parameter?
Declare your local parameters as local parameters. Passing them in as arguments takes up some extra CPU cycles for no reason. Declaring a local int parameter has zero cost in terms of CPU cycles.
Sep
16
comment Dead lock pthread C++ with signaling
@AlexeyKukanov a better solution for the stop flag would be to create a pipe() or socketpair() at startup, and have the main thread select() on one of the sockets for ready-for-ready. Then have your signal handler write() a byte to the other socket; that will cause the main thread to wake up from select() and go away (it should still call pthread_join() on the other threads before exiting though, to avoid potential race conditions during process cleanup)
Sep
16
comment fwrite writes out bytes, not the actual integer
Perhaps fprintf() would be more appropriate than printf() for this use case?
Sep
15
comment Translations of QMessageBox not work in Qt5.3
If your program works right under Qt 5.2 and the exact same program does not work right Qt 5.3, it's probably a Qt bug and your best option is to report it to Digia. Be sure to include a small compileable example program that demonstrates the problem.
Sep
15
comment 4-bit data array to short array conversion in c
I'm surprised that even compiles. When I try to compile it, I get: temp.c:5:14: error: definition of variable with array type needs an explicit size or an initializer
Sep
14
comment Thread not working properly - C
Identify the data items that can be read or written by both threads. Before a thread accesses one of those items, have it lock the mutex. When it's done accessing, have it unlock the mutex so the other thread can proceed.
Sep
13
comment Thread not working properly - C
@Akes55 No, that won't work either, because you can't guarantee that thread A will "see" the value set by thread B soon enough to do the right thing. You have to use a mutex or critical section; they are designed to do the right thing across all hardware; and nothing less will work reliably. (Well, that's not 100% true; there are some ways to do lock-free thread-safe data structures using special atomic primitives, but they are extremely tricky to get right and if you haven't mastered locking primitives yet, the chances of employing them correctly is near-zero)
Sep
13
comment Threaded process not working properly - follow up
A bool (like isQueueProcessing) cannot be used by itself as a synchronization mechanism -- there is no guarantee that when thread A writes to the bool, that thread B will ever "see" the update. Use a Mutex or Critical Section instead, as God intended ;)
Sep
13
comment Qt 5.3.1 - a dramatic increase in performance
I'm a bit suspicious of the reported results -- given the incredible speed of CPUs these days (relative to storage media), code that reads from the filesystem is usually I/O bound, and so making the code more CPU efficient typically doesn't result in a measurable speedup. My guess as to an explanation: when you tested 5.0.2, most or all of the data set had to be read from the hard drive, which is slow. Then when you tested with 5.3.1, most or all of the data set was still cached in RAM (from before), and thus the program never had to wait for the hard disk --> fast :)