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Oct
6
revised Accessing the global variable when global and local variables have same name
added 4 characters in body
Mar
17
comment Compile error: virtual memory exhausted
might be a wild shot, but since it breaks down at 3GiB... could it be that You are running a x86 version of the compiler and simply runs out of the virtual memory as it hits 32-bit addressing limitations?
Aug
17
comment Can i code Assambly for x86 Windows from x64 Linux ?
Wine runs perfectly fine on 64bit Linux. And I use it to test my Windows code all the time.
Aug
14
revised Behaviour of && in C programming language
He used 0s intead of Os in the word "ZERO" on the left size. It's grammatically correct and consistent now.
Aug
14
suggested approved edit on Behaviour of && in C programming language
Aug
11
comment Maximum Array Size in C
@JacobPollack I don't see how's that a problem. Also note that mmap / shared memory is also "dynamic memory".
Aug
11
comment Maximum Array Size in C
Why don't You use dynamic memory?
Aug
11
revised Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
added 399 characters in body
Aug
11
revised Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
deleted 2592 characters in body
Aug
10
comment signed and unsigned in C
Turbo C is ancient, 16-bit and there should be 0 reason to use it. GCC is better than Turbo C in practically every way.
Aug
10
comment Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
For me it gives a much smaller - only a 2% increase over the OP's vanilla version. (identical results with both 4 and 8 -fold unrolling)
Aug
10
comment Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
BTW, I updated the first part of my post. Among other things, I included instruction counts.
Aug
10
revised Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
added 363 characters in body
Aug
10
comment Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
@wildplasser Also, few percent? The difference between the fastest non-vectorized and the fastest vectorized one is a bit more than 6.5%. That might not look like much, but it may be very significant on larger scale. With such difference, it would mean e.g. spending 11 hours and 20 minutes of CPU time instead of spending 12 hours. A whooping 40 minutes. Little things do add up, so it's far from "futile"
Aug
10
comment Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
@wildplasser define "real code". Also some other things: the total size of data is 10,000,000 * 8 * 3 = 228 megabytes. On my normal clocks, my theoretical memory bandwidth is 29.8 GB/s. That portion of the code runs for about 1.1 second if I set my CPU to the lowest available clock speed. In that time it can send the whole data 131 times over. So I don't see where a memory bottleneck would occur. Also, a "memory bottleneck" theory wouldn't go with the fact that if I double my CPU clock, that portion of the code starts running twice as fast, while doubling the memory clock does hardly anything.
Aug
10
answered Why vectorizing the loop does not have performance improvement
Mar
20
suggested rejected edit on Memory leak error?
Feb
25
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
7
awarded  Critic
Feb
4
comment Dynamic memory and pointers
@Nelson.b.austin yes, sort of. It works in almost the same way an array works. Actually, you can even do mem_start_ptr[0] for the first one and mem_start_ptr[1] for the second one. And it will still be perfectly valid && correct. Though, You should REALLY read about pointer arithmetics and dynamic memory allocation. Google is Your friend there =]