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seen Mar 8 at 1:08

Feb
27
awarded  Teacher
Feb
27
comment How are pointers “variables whose values are an address” when we can do char *string = “string”?
Actually, string literal itself is just an address where the string is stored.(except for when initialising array of characters like in the example above)
Feb
27
comment How are pointers “variables whose values are an address” when we can do char *string = “string”?
string and integer are different, in that string is an "array" of characters. ptr stores just the address of the first character of the string. when compiler sees ptr = "string";, it allocates memory and store "string" there. and then assign its address to ptr.
Feb
27
answered How are pointers “variables whose values are an address” when we can do char *string = “string”?
Jan
22
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
17
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jan
10
asked PATH variable in .zshenv or .zshrc
Jun
8
comment Nested-if in Haskell
Thank you, I know the pattern matching now, but it is introduced in chapter 3 and the exercise is at the end of the chapter 2. It seems like the exercises and some examples in Real World Haskell demand more knowledge than that is already taught. As a completely beginner, I should find more organized tutorial...
Jun
6
awarded  Commentator
Jun
6
comment Nested-if in Haskell
I see. Following Ziyao's answer, the type of the lastButOne is [[a]]->[a], and it works well for such as lastButOne [[1,2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4]]. I think, that's the reason why this is compiled successfully.
Jun
6
awarded  Supporter
Jun
6
comment Nested-if in Haskell
Thank you. This answer is just what I wanted. So, [] is interpreted as a list and that was the problem...
Jun
6
comment Nested-if in Haskell
VoronoiPotato//I think tail (tail [1, 2]) is just []
Jun
6
comment Nested-if in Haskell
Lee//Thank you for the suggestion, but I didn't see any mention about pattern matching in chapter 1 and chapter 2. So I don't know about it.
Jun
6
asked Nested-if in Haskell
Jan
24
comment when assigning to void pointer in C
@Dietrich Epp: I think he just pointed out that there was no void* in the old K&R C and char* is used instead.
Jan
24
comment when assigning to void pointer in C
Thank you, I think your answer is the closest answer to my question. I googled some time and found that the string literal itself is just an address, so the variable 'b' in the code is a pointer as well as the string literal.
Jan
24
comment when assigning to void pointer in C
@Kerrek SB: No, I know * is for assigning a value to what the pointer points. My question is just about the pointer to void. My C tutorial shows just a code example above and doesn't explain why you don't need * operator when a pointer to void is used. Anyway, thanks for the answer. I should use the precise terminology.
Jan
24
comment when assigning to void pointer in C
Yes, my terminology is incorrect, but you know what I mean from the code above, right?
Jan
24
asked when assigning to void pointer in C