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  • 39 votes cast
Jan
30
asked Dynamically including/excluding arguments in Rails
Jan
18
accepted Rails & Memcached: Optimizing multiple fetches
Jan
18
comment Rails & Memcached: Optimizing multiple fetches
Yes, what I mean is that with 'fetch' the missing objects are written to cache so that on the next read it will be a hit. The way I understand the code above is that it will indeed get the full set of messages but missed objects will still be misses next time around.
Jan
18
comment Rails & Memcached: Optimizing multiple fetches
Just realized that this is missing one nice thing about fetch, which is that it sets the missed reads with the m.as_json value. Any thoughts on fixing that? One approach that comes to mind is passing @messages and hits off to a background job and writing the missing objects asynchronously.
Jan
18
comment Rails & Memcached: Optimizing multiple fetches
This looks great and will reduce round-trips to the cache. Just to educate me further why did you pass keys as "*keys" into read_multi. I've never used this convention in ruby/rails? Looks like a pointer to me.
Jan
17
asked Rails & Memcached: Optimizing multiple fetches
Jan
8
comment Using caching to optimize a timeline in Rails
Also I should note, like you raise, I do plan to use a background worker for fanning out the message
Jan
8
comment Using caching to optimize a timeline in Rails
Thanks for this. I follow your method, but am still wrapping my brain around its implications. From what I gather, one potential drawback here is that sorting would need to be done on-the-fly (given that following/unfollowing can happen at anytime). With regards to my original approach, if I were to ensure persistence and efficiently inserted into lists, rather than clearing/recreating, perhaps I avoid the issues you raise?
Jan
8
asked Using caching to optimize a timeline in Rails
Dec
27
accepted Redis-RB out of the box throwing ECONNREFUSED error on local
Dec
6
revised Oauth2 flow to request a token using Facebook uid for credentials
deleted 24 characters in body
Dec
6
answered Oauth2 flow to request a token using Facebook uid for credentials
Dec
6
asked Oauth2 flow to request a token using Facebook uid for credentials
Nov
29
answered Redis-RB out of the box throwing ECONNREFUSED error on local
Nov
29
comment Redis-RB out of the box throwing ECONNREFUSED error on local
Doing some more digging around looks like this just installs the client, but not the server. That's a separate process. Will update when I get that up and running.
Nov
29
asked Redis-RB out of the box throwing ECONNREFUSED error on local
Nov
27
comment Returning a semi-unique set of most recent records
Also for my particular situation, I'm considering just adding a flag to the table where I flag the old records of a highlight_type_id. Then I could just filter these out. Seems like a cleaner solution, ya? Either way still curious if there is a clean, performant way of solving this without a flag.
Nov
27
comment Returning a semi-unique set of most recent records
Great points here. I like your second suggestion, as it's easy to understand. A typical user will have ~50 highlight records, and at upper bounds this may reach something like ~200 records. Any idea if this could be a performance concern?
Nov
27
comment Returning a semi-unique set of most recent records
This appears to "work" but I'm not sure what it's actually doing. GROUP does return one record per highlight_type_id but I'm not sure what logic it uses to select the particular record. As 244an suggests, when something like user.highlights.group('highlight_type_id').order('created_at DESC') doesn't work as hoped, as the ordering is done after the grouping. If I could understand the logic behind group's selection of the record I could be more confident in this approach.
Nov
26
asked Returning a semi-unique set of most recent records