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bio website petr.pudlak.name
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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 3 hours ago

8h
comment Avoiding duplicates in breadth-first search
@MoreAxes Even better, just completely skip visiting nodes that are in the set, when constructing another layer.
9h
comment Avoiding duplicates in breadth-first search
@MoreAxes In particular IntSet is implemented as a balanced tree whose leaves are 32-bit or 64-bit words used as bitmaps. So the structure is very efficient both in time and space, and all operations are just O(log n).
10h
answered Avoiding duplicates in breadth-first search
15h
asked How come that we can implement call/cc, but the classical logic (intuitionistic + call/cc) is not constructive?
15h
answered How come that we can implement call/cc, but the classical logic (intuitionistic + call/cc) is not constructive?
2d
comment How to reduce boilerplate dealing with Maybe and lists?
You could use mapMaybe or catMaybes from Data.Maybe.
2d
comment What are the values of a polymorphically encoded recursive algebraic data type?
@Hanno This is beyond my knowledge. If you find out, please add a comment.
2d
comment Arrows are exactly equivalent to applicative functors?
@TomEllis OK, that makes sense, I'm getting more inclined towards the example. However, to be convincing, I'd like this to be clarified: The power of Applicative (Arrplicative (Kleisli IO)) could be much stronger than Applicative IO, in particular because in the definition of its instance we indirectly use . from Kleisli. So it should be discussed that even this isn't strong enough. While I'm inclined to believe that it's not possible, there could still be some clever trick, such as passing some monadic/functional values through this applicative etc.
2d
comment Arrows are exactly equivalent to applicative functors?
@AndrewC The problem in danidiaz's answer is that he constructs a Kleisli arrow from a monad, while the OP asks about constructing an arrow differently (as f (a -> b)) just from the Applicative instance.
2d
comment Arrows are exactly equivalent to applicative functors?
I'd say this is a bad example/argument, because it addresses something quite different that the OP is asking. The correspondence the OP is referring to is between plain Arrow and Applicative, while you're talking about the Kleisli arrow, which corresponds to a Monad. It is clear, that monads are more powerful than applicatives, but the question was about arrows induced just by applicatives without any Monad constraint as newtype Applicarrow f a b = Applicarrow{ runApplicarrow :: f (a -> b) }.
Jul
9
answered How to get all algebraic associative operations on a finite set by efficient algorithm?
Jul
9
answered Does this Bool-producer to Maybe-producer function appear in any common library?
Jul
9
asked Is it possible to compare two types, if one is assignable from the other?
Jul
9
comment Does this Bool-producer to Maybe-producer function appear in any common library?
Or splat = mfilter . fmap (. return).
Jul
9
awarded  Good Question
Jul
8
answered Haskell: Lazy vs. Strict Text values, which one is recommended when?
Jul
7
comment What are the values of a polymorphically encoded recursive algebraic data type?
@Hanno My answer is given for the Curry-style version of System-F that doesn't have any type annotations or Λ in terms. But I believe the same argument can be used for Church-style as well. I'd also recommend this answer which gives completely different proof - it doesn't show that there are just 2 terms in normal form, but it shows that all terms of the boolean type are extensionally equal to K and K*.
Jul
7
comment Risks of using unsafeperformIO on randomIO
I'd suggest you to use the Rand monad or its RandT transformer. This way you can make your code pure, without needing to use IO or to carry the random state around all the time.
Jul
6
revised How to force the evaluation of a lambda term in haskell to the strong normal form
added 111 characters in body
Jul
6
comment How to force the evaluation of a lambda term in haskell to the strong normal form
@JakeMcArthur Good point, I'll update the answer.