8,963 reputation
11633
bio website dolda2000.com/~fredrik
location
age
visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen 6 hours ago

6h
comment Nonblocking stdio
@chux: I did see that question, but it seems to have very little overlap with this one, and the answers are just about terminal control.
19h
comment Memory allocation in Ubuntu
@MOH: Yes. 32-bit mode implies 32-bit pointers, which implies a 4 GB address space (some of which is used by the kernel, so even less in practice). You can't use more memory than you have address space for.
1d
comment Memory allocation in Ubuntu
@MOH: If uname -m returns i686, then you are indeed not running in 64-bit mode. If you were, it would say x86_64.
1d
comment Memory allocation in Ubuntu
@MOH: Also, just to be sure, how did you verify that you're running in 64-bit mode?
1d
comment Memory allocation in Ubuntu
Is the program in the question a Python program?
2d
answered Memory allocation in Ubuntu
Dec
26
comment Nonblocking stdio
@PhilippBraun: The point of this is to stay somewhat portable with different stdio implementations. Otherwise, I'd just do this in some way that happens to work with glibc.
Dec
26
comment Nonblocking stdio
@rodrigo: Not exactly what I was looking for, indeed. Adding proper synchronization and stuff to this program would be more complex than manually buffering I/O.
Dec
26
asked Nonblocking stdio
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
@n.m.: If you're going to such extremes, I would argue the discussion is quite pointless, because I'm not particularly interested in writing pure ISO C with no system, architecture or otherwise external dependencies. GCC certainly does not warn me when linking against functions doing Linux syscalls, even though those cannot be expressed in pure C either. It also makes sense, I would argue, that a symbol can have an address but no size, in which case void would make sense. And regardless of any of this, the construct itself appears to be valid C.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
@n.m.: It is true, of course, that you cannot define that symbol in C, but neither do you need to. You can define it either in some other language, or do as I did with objcopy. This still appears as a valid way to refer to such an external symbol from within a C object file. I don't think the entire program has to be written in C for one file to be consider valid C in itself.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
@n.m.: The answer I linked seems to indicate that you can.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
@n.m.: According to this answer, this is not a non-standard GCC construct.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
Sure, but by that argument, memcpy and its likes could also just as well take char * arguments rather than void *, since all memory is bytes. It just seemed very nice to be able to declare symbols that should never be used directly void.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
Not to mention, of course, that it indicates that GCC suggests against doing this, and I'd like to know why that would be suggested.
Dec
3
comment Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
Perhaps, but having my output shock full of these will squelch meaningful warnings. :)
Dec
3
asked Why has GCC started warning on taking the address of a void expression?
Nov
19
comment Can I detect the text codec used in a string?
@JohnY: Just for the record, there are tons of codecs that can never fail, since they simply map every possible byte to one, single, unique Unicode character. Common examples include the ISO-8859 encodings (Latin1 is ISO-8859-1), KOI-8, CP437, CP850 and CP1252, but there are many others also in common use.
Nov
19
comment Can I detect the text codec used in a string?
Certainly, but since you do, indeed, not know it, I hardly think there's any other way to do it. I mean, this is basically what chardet does as well, only with a bit more sophistication.
Nov
19
revised Can I detect the text codec used in a string?
deleted 7 characters in body