712 reputation
514
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Sep 18 at 7:13

4h
awarded  Popular Question
2d
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
11
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen The amount of memory used by an algorithm on a given computer is a function. That function is O(1), because it is bounded above. Furthermore, algorithms have a finite number of steps, and thus there are countably many of them; therefore they can not be the same as functions from real numbers to real numbers, which are not countable in any sense.
Jul
11
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen One who can not explain the basics does not truly understand them. My original claim was not that this is how the notation is used in practice, which I think is pretty clear from my original post. Again, it is a variation of a point that Sedgewick makes, that "as n goes to infinity" can obscure what happens when n goes to values that you can actually solve on a computer.
Jun
25
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen That link speaks of functions, not algorithms, not computers. No algorithm can take more then O(1) space on a real computer, because there will exist some n, such that for all problem sizes larger then that n, the algorithm does not complete and while not complete stays below a constant memory space. If you measure the memory usage of a failed algorithm, then it will be O(1); if you don't, it won't have a Big O, since you can't take a limit to infinity on a function that isn't defined for sufficiently large numbers.
Jun
24
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen nomen's definition, not necessarily the one actually used by computer scientists. Cf. Turing machines with oracles.
Jun
24
comment Is “else if” a single keyword?
Fortran (at least the fixed form versions), and all standardized versions of Algol allow spaces anywhere. One story has it that apparently punch card punchers were prone to adding spaces when typing in code; another simply that allowing spaces in variable names would let programmers use better names and the problems weren't foreseen.
Jun
24
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen If you can talk about Big-O of an algorithm running on a Turing Machine with an oracle, you can talk about the Big-O of an algorithm running on a finite state machine that closely models real life system.
Jun
24
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@johncip Landau notation doesn't tell you what happens as the input grows; it tells you what happens as the input goes to infinity. If the algorithm grows slowly for mathematically small n (say, less then 10^10) and then turns exponential, this notation will tell you it's exponential. Robert Sedgewick in his lectures complains about people using algorithms with better Big-O that will be faster only with problems that are bigger then every computer on Earth together could solve.
Jun
24
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen Did you read my answer? Because i think i addressed that. A given computer has a constant amount of memory and thus any algorithm will use at most that constant amount of memory or fail. Since memory usage is bounded above by a constant for real machines, it's O(1).
Jun
23
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
@nomen: If we have a computer with 256 bytes of memory running one instruction per second, then the computer can transition through no more than 256 ^ 256 states. Either it will return a result in those 256 ^ 256 steps, or it will not terminate. So there's our constant; for all n, calculating Ackermann (n, n) will take time less then or equal to 256 ^ 256 seconds if it can be done at all, and since that's a constant, this is O(1).
Jun
23
comment What does it mean when it is stipulated that extra allowed space is O(1)?
There's no need to sleep; any program that always runs in less then x seconds is O(1), since there's a constant for which it's always smaller then. Technically speaking, on finite real-world machines, all terminating problems are O(1), since it takes a finite amount of time to cycle through all states. (Well, all problems, since the computer will break eventually.) That's just not a helpful way to approach algorithmic analysis.
May
28
comment string operations in mysql [counting a string in different columns]
@RagingBull I would find it quite likely that someone asking a question like this is a student or someone else doing their own database work. Hopefully a DBA would know about normalization.
Apr
20
awarded  Yearling
Feb
26
answered Julia for image processing and speech recognition
Jan
30
awarded  Excavator
Jan
29
revised Are there any provable real-world languages? (scala?)
It's Ada, not ADA
Jan
29
suggested suggested edit on Are there any provable real-world languages? (scala?)
Jan
12
awarded  Necromancer
Nov
20
comment I need high performance. Will there be a difference if I use C or C++?
let us continue this discussion in chat