912 reputation
318
bio website tobiasmuehlbauer.com
location Munich, Germany
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 8 hours ago

. . .


Dec
10
comment Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
Just verified; similar behavior with glibc malloc for me.
Dec
10
comment Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
@HristoIliev: This is interesting. We also have 4 socket Nehalem EX system; kernel 3.5.0. More specifically 4 X7560 CPUs, 1TB main memory (256GiB per socket) and the 5520/5500/X58 chipset. I get 178.021 ms with 1 NUMA node, 338.373 ms with 2 NUMA nodes, 455.898 ms with 3 NUMA nodes, 561.749 ms with 4 NUMA nodes. I made multiple measurements, all with similar results. This is with TBB scalable_allacator. I'll just do another round with the glibc allocator.
Dec
10
revised Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
added link to Intel TBB forums question
Dec
10
comment Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
@CoryNelson: "We'd really like to keep a dynamic allocation approach instead of preallocating memory and managing it within the application." -- Just to give you some numbers: I preallocated memory using a tbb::fixed_pool and malloc'ed from there. This approach indeed scales on NUMA. However on Linux (speaking of Kernel 2.6+, haven't tried on earlier) one needs to preallocate and memset to actually have a hold of the memory. For me this means preallocating at least 2GB and this takes a whole lot of time.
Dec
10
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
10
comment Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
I added the code to reproduce the issue. We monitored all QPI links, link load was below 1% for all of them. I haven't fully verified but think that thread binding has no effect here. This is more an issue of heap contention or better said a problem with the synchronization needed to allocate big (here 8MiB) memory regions on the heap.
Dec
10
revised Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
added 2096 characters in body
Dec
10
comment Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
The issue here is independent from the source array (and even postprocessing; its just to give the context why we need heap allocation). I created a minimal example where 8MB chunks are allocated on the heap up to a certain size (in parallel). What we see is that with one CPU it takes x ms, with 2 CPUs it takes roughly 2*x ms, .... So it does not scale with the number of sockets on NUMA architectures. It does however scale on one socket with the number of threads.
Dec
10
comment Eclipse CDT Debugging: Show dynamic type
Good question; anyone?
Dec
10
asked Scalable allocation of large (8MB) memory regions on NUMA architectures
Nov
14
comment Simple MySQL table design
continuation from the previous comment. c) if you argue to use numeric ids instead of verbose pks for performance reasons, I can tell you that not every DBMS handles non-numeric pks as badly as, e.g, MySQL - it can even be the case that the additional indirection (index lookup on the 'verbose pk' -> generated pk) creates a bottleneck in other DBMSs; d) lastly, if you are afraid that your pk is not really unique than this is a relational design issue and for all other cases, the DBMS ensures that pks, generated or not, are always unique (index lookup).
Nov
14
comment Simple MySQL table design
I wouldn't say so for multiple reasons: a) it is perfectly fine to change a primary key (pk) - if another relation's column references the pk it should have a foreign key (fk) constraint with an 'on update cascade' construct so that a change to the pk propagates to fk relation; b) numeric ids are generic but that is THE reason it makes them flawed in relational design - why should, e.g., a person be better identified by some weird number than their SSN (I give you credit that the SSN itself is a weird number but why add yet another indirection ;)); my argument continues in the next comment.
Nov
13
comment Boost Spirit QI grammar slow for parsing delimited strings
Sure, I attached the code. Mind that I read the CSV data from a file. You could create sample data on the fly.
Nov
13
revised Boost Spirit QI grammar slow for parsing delimited strings
added 1806 characters in body
Nov
13
comment Boost Spirit QI grammar slow for parsing delimited strings
I'm taking a std::string and want to generate a std::vector<Row> where Row is a struct, e.g., struct Row { std::string a, int b }; I know that I essentially duplicate the memory footprint of the string (or even more than that depending on the data types). However the memory consumption while in parse_phrase is much higher than that. The resulting vector however is correct.
Nov
13
revised Boost Spirit QI grammar slow for parsing delimited strings
added 3 characters in body
Nov
13
asked Boost Spirit QI grammar slow for parsing delimited strings
Nov
12
comment Boost Spirit QI slow
I once experienced the same. Spirit qi seems not to be able to handle variable length strings efficiently. Anyone has a solution for that?
Nov
12
comment Simple MySQL table design
What normal form does the proposed schema violate? I cannot see any violation of either 1NF, 2NF, 3NF, or BCNF.
Nov
12
answered Simple MySQL table design