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Apr
22
asked How to detect end of file using scipy.io.FortranFile
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
4
comment Equivalent to matlab's imagesc in matplotlib?
Note that @tcaswell 's comment is not the general case, and will only work if your pixels are 1 unit apart. You want to use 0.5dx, where dx is the spacing of your pixels. So, for example, if your pixels are separated by 5mm, you would do: extent=[-2.5 + x_start, x_end + 2.5, y_start - 2.5, y_end + 2.5]
Jan
15
comment “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
I think my original mistake confused things. I am multiplying the index to the tranpose of the dataframe (as in my example). The index must have the same number columns as the transposed dataframe. i.e. I am forcing this operation to be compatible. So for the short example I give df.index has shape (3,) and df.T has shape (2,3). I think numpy broadcasting (which I thought should apply here) goes from last dimension to the first. So the 3's should match and the operation should be successful. That's why df.T.values*df.index.values will always work.
Jan
14
answered “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
Jan
14
comment “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
I apologize, I made a mistake in my example code. The last line should be df.Tdf.index It seems that df.Tdf.index.values does what I want, so it must be something about the difference between the way an Index and an array broadcast. @PaulH I'm not sure what you mean. How would a dataframe have unequal columns? Do you mean unequal length columns somehow?
Jan
14
revised “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
Fixed mistake in example code
Jan
14
comment “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
Yeah, I was thinking that seemed new. Makes me a little nervous also, but rather convenient here. My version is 0.15.2
Jan
13
asked “ValueError: cannot evaluate a numeric op with unequal lengths” when finding centroids in DataFrame
Jan
7
comment HIs there a way to get a numpy-style view to a slice of an array stored in a hdf5 file
Basically, I often target an entire analysis on a subset of the full datacube. However, the subset is also too large to fill in memory. One workflow that is occurring to me is that I could copy the subset to a new temporary file, and work from that.
Jan
6
comment HIs there a way to get a numpy-style view to a slice of an array stored in a hdf5 file
Yes, I'm quite familiar with pandas DataFrames (although, not so much their 3D functionality). However, that mostly works in-memory, correct? I know you can use pytables to copy the tables to hdf5 files. Is there a way to use this for the functionality I need? Also, pandas usually provides high-level datatypes for tabular data I think. Isn't it overkill for simple arrays? That said, if it does what I need, I'd happily use it.
Jan
6
comment Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
My view question is probably worth a separate post, since this has become a general overview of why HDF5 is a good way to store data. The new post is at stackoverflow.com/q/27803331/1361752
Jan
6
comment HIs there a way to get a numpy-style view to a slice of an array stored in a hdf5 file
This is a follow up to my earlier question: stackoverflow.com/q/27710245/1361752
Jan
6
asked HIs there a way to get a numpy-style view to a slice of an array stored in a hdf5 file
Jan
6
comment Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
I agree that it has to go into memory at some point. However, views are still useful. For example, I often want to do analysis on a specific sector of the cube too large to fit in memory. A view of a slice of the data is a nice book-keeping device. I can pass the view of the cube to any code designed to run on the entire cube. Otherwise, all of my code, which is designed to run piece-wise over the data, will need to be able to optionally run over specific ranges. A view would let me reuse the same code designed to run over the entire code, save coding time, and be less bug-prone.
Jan
6
accepted Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
Jan
6
comment Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
Thanks a lot for the detailed answer!
Dec
30
comment Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
However, your point about the average read time is interesting.
Dec
30
comment Is there an analysis speed or memory usage advantage to using HDF5 for large array storage (instead of flat binary files)?
Thanks. I agree that h5py returns a dataset that is similar to a memmap. But, if you do a slice of the h5py dataset, it returns a numpy array, which I believe (?) means the data has been put into memory needlessly. A memmamp returns a view to the original memmap if possible. In other words: type(cube) gives h5py._hl.dataset.Dataset. While type(cube[0:1,:,:]) gives numpy.ndarray.