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Nov
18
reviewed Approve cannot use SessionLoginBehaviour SSO_WITH_FALLBACK
Nov
18
reviewed Approve Linq with complex join condition
Nov
17
comment Why features extraction?
Except the question is specifically about feature extraction and why it is done. It may not be as relevant to text classification, where the desired features often are the counts/frequencies of the dictionary words but it is very relevant and frequently used for other classification problems. It should also be noted that regularization isn't "free" since it has the side-effect of introducing bias into the estimator/classifier.
Nov
15
comment Why features extraction?
@AndreasMueller It would be great if you could expand on that comment or perhaps provide some references. I've used feature extraction - and seen it used - in numerous contexts and regularization was definitely not "used basically all the time."
Nov
13
answered Why features extraction?
Nov
13
comment Why would my neural network give different values for the same input?
What is your NN structure (number of layers & neurons per layer)?
Nov
9
awarded  machine-learning
Nov
7
revised Conflict resolution step fires two rules in CLIPS
added 6 characters in body
Nov
7
comment Conflict resolution step fires two rules in CLIPS
Yes, that is correct. It selects the rule on the agenda to be fired next. But that doesn't prevent other rules on the agenda from subsequently firing unless the fired rule does something to take them off of the agenda. A point to note is that not all rules on the agenda are guaranteed to fire - the rule that is currently selected can change which rules are on the agenda (e.g., by retracting facts or changing the current module).
Nov
7
answered Conflict resolution step fires two rules in CLIPS
Nov
4
awarded  Curious
Oct
22
accepted Implementing Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) with PyMC
Oct
9
comment Machine learning - perceptrons
@Meteorite My initial answer wasn't quite right so I've modified it and (hopefully) made it more clear.
Oct
9
revised Machine learning - perceptrons
Correction
Oct
9
answered Machine learning - perceptrons
Oct
9
comment OCR using a Neural Network
Neither is inherently more accurate. Back-propagation is the most common method for training MLPs and is usually trained faster. If the input will always be one of the allowable letters, then a single MLP with as many outputs as letters is probably the way to go. Note that you will probably need one or two hidden layers in your MLP.
Oct
8
comment OCR using a Neural Network
It's not quite that simple and there are multiple ways you can set up your solution. One is to create an MLP with as many outputs as you have letters. Then, you would classify an input as the letter with the highest output value. Alternately, you could train a one-vs-rest MLP for each letter and use the appropriate MLP for a given test. Another factor is whether you will allow inputs that are not any of the trained letters but it isn't clear from your question if that is allowed.
Oct
8
answered OCR using a Neural Network
Sep
29
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
29
awarded  Nice Answer