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5h
comment What are the differences between a pointer variable and a reference variable in C++?
Int'restin'ly, point 9 is one of the areas where C++ differs from C - in C you can take the address of a temporary: int *y = &(int){12};.
5h
comment Function declaration inside of function — why?
As for your downside, I don't understand it. Declarations have no effect on runtime (?), and you can declare a function multiple times at the toplevel too if it entertains you. I don't see how reducing the scope of a name could ever have an actual negative consequence (yes, it provides a place to make mistakes... lots of things do, one would assume that it's being written by someone who knows the signature and is restricting someone else's visibility because the locally-declared name doesn't form part of the API at that point).
5h
comment Function declaration inside of function — why?
@JonathanLeffler Those points apply better to other languages than to C; C's toplevel scope is a) ordered and b) not shared between translation units. Even though an externally-linked function can be accessed from anywhere in a module, if the name isn't declared, it isn't in scope; and the order of declarations can mean this is in effect for some functions within a TU as well, depending on its structure. Functions are not all in scope all the time.
11h
revised Function declaration inside of function — why?
added 932 characters in body
11h
answered Function declaration inside of function — why?
11h
comment Function declaration inside of function — why?
@haneefmubarak you're arguing a point that is trivially and demonstrably wrong: the C standard's exact words are "The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of int and with no parameters". It then goes on to describe the argc/argv case and other options, but (void) is literally the first thing it describes; it is not possible to get more idiomatic. (This isn't even relevant to the OP!)
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comment Lisp compiler design for embedded systems?
Well, if you say they're compile-time only, then they're compile-time only and have no overhead. Lisp macros allow you to extend the language in arbitrarily complex ways: any semantic that can be implemented by a compiler can be implemented by Lisp macros too. So you literally can do whatever you have a clear idea of and the patience to implement (do you have a clear idea about what "compile-time closures" means for your language?).
Apr
17
comment Lisp compiler design for embedded systems?
The problem is that you haven't specified what exactly "these features" are, or what kind of code you intend to write with them. There is no real answer to the question in its current form beyond "yeah, probably". Some of the hinted features also have multiple styles of implementation that would radically affect the answer (e.g. AOP can be compile-time or runtime, with different implications).
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