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  • 63 votes cast
Aug
24
comment Fastest way to sort 10 numbers? (numbers are 32 bit)
I'm not an expert, but maybe a bitwise XOR swap would be even faster? I tend to use that technique in javascript, I don't know if it's also true in c. Something like: var1^=var2, var2^=var1, var1^=var2
Aug
24
comment strtr is replacing in an unexpected way
Well, just keep in mind that this solution is very specific and will only work with this case. As soon as another word that starts with 'me' is added, it'll have a similar problem again.
Aug
20
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
8
comment Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
@jfriend00 I've edited the question a few minutes ago, adding the point about jspref. This question is not meaningless, it's asked exactly because what the article is stating is not matching jspref results. Other questions here alreay give the (accepted) answer that a backwards loop is faster - I'll add them to my question as reference. This question is about the discrepancy of the two (three) sources.
Aug
8
comment Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
@jfriend00 I tried to find a few, but all jsperf tests (since over an hour) are always just displaying "Loading cumulative results data…" whitout ever finishing. Don't know if jsperf is just down or something? I can't access any results. If they work for you: jsperf.com/loops/33, jsperf.com/fastest-array-loops-in-javascript/15
Aug
8
revised Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
added 381 characters in body
Aug
8
comment Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
@jfriend00 sorry, you were quite fast - my previous comment was refering to your first comment, not your second - just FYI ;)
Aug
8
comment Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
@jfriend00 Yes, but that's also the problem (and reason for this question): jsperf seems to imply that the backwards loop is faster (I've seen a couple of tests floating around here during the years). So jsperf actually contradicts this - but maybe that's also the case because those tests are too focused on one thing? I was really interested to hear if the argument "Because all CPU caches in the world expect the processing to be 'straight', you will have cache misses..." is grounded in reality - because if that's the case, backwards loops should theoretically be slower, right?
Aug
8
asked Javascript backwards loop slower when working with arrays?
Aug
3
comment close dynamically created Div on button click
@DarrenSweeney Yes I just realized that a moment after posting, don't know what I was thinking ;) Edited it.
Aug
3
revised close dynamically created Div on button click
Fixed an error)
Aug
3
answered close dynamically created Div on button click
Jul
31
asked Difference between nested <nav> techniques
Jul
18
revised java Array assignment slowly than List.add()
added 121 characters in body
Jul
18
answered java Array assignment slowly than List.add()
Jul
17
awarded  Custodian
Jul
17
reviewed Approve Prevent two players from being matched twice in Swiss Style Tournament
Jul
17
comment Prevent two players from being matched twice in Swiss Style Tournament
@Malco please see my second Edit (2) for a clearer explanation ;)
Jul
17
revised Prevent two players from being matched twice in Swiss Style Tournament
added 2524 characters in body
Jul
17
comment Prevent two players from being matched twice in Swiss Style Tournament
@Malco the keyword continue just skips to the end of the current loop, while the keyword break breaks out of the current loop. If you are in the loop for( var ii ... ) and continue, it just basically increments ii, and goes through for( var ii ...) again, whitout touching for( var i ... ). With break, for(var ii ...) is completly interrupted, and the code just continues where the loop ends at } - in this case, it just increments for (var i ...) - I updated my answer to clarify your last questions a bit, but I'll add this one as well.