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visits member for 6 years, 4 months
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Cofounder of Flying Frog Consultancy Ltd.

2h
comment How to implement a garbage collector?
Send me your e-mail address and I'll give you a free copy.
Jan
24
comment C# versus C++ performance
@JerryCoffin: So you agree that Microsoft use generational scavenging (1984) and that it is explicitly a copying collector and you agree that mark region (2002) is newer and can by non-moving and, therefore, is a different algorithm. Then you must also agree that Microsoft's generational GC is not nearly state of the art and there may indeed be significant performance gains yet to be had, such as the 3x performance improvement that can be obtained by logically ageing a nursery rather than marking, copying and updating all pointers.
Jan
23
answered Can an OCaml program use more than one processor core?
Jan
17
comment C# versus C++ performance
The inability to allocate young objects around old objects in a partially-filled generation is a characteristic of generational GC algorithms though. Generational GCs are explicitly copying collectors, as you said, whereas mark region can be completely non-moving.
Jan
15
comment C# versus C++ performance
By copying live objects.
Jan
15
comment C# versus C++ performance
In his seminal 1984 paper, Ungar explicitly stated "copies live objects".
Jan
15
comment C# versus C++ performance
@JerryCoffin: "The very fact that it's promoting a generation points to the fact that it's a generational scavenger". Generational GC refers to physically copying data between a constant number of statically-allocated generations (e.g. gen0, gen1 and gen2 on .NET). Mark region allocates into regions that are dynamically allocated and can logically promote an entire region without copying any data. This is described in detail in the literature I cited.
Jan
15
comment C# versus C++ performance
"the burden still falls on you". Here is a trivial counter example written in F# Seq.length(File.ReadLines "foo.txt"). The inner function ReadLines opens the file. The outer function length closes the file when it has finished. As you can see, the inherent "burden" you refer to does not exist.
Jan
11
answered Concurrency and memory models
Jan
9
awarded  Guru
Jan
6
comment Advantages of stack-based bytecodes or infinite register machines
@IraBaxter: "uh, why did it take you two years to decide this?". I am a slow thinker. Let me mull over what you've said. I'll get back to you in 2017. ;-)
Jan
6
comment Advantages of stack-based bytecodes or infinite register machines
You answer seems disjoint to me. You said that expression trees "aren't effective for modeling the entire program" but haven't explained why, then said that "a good representation of a program is really a graph" only to go on and discuss exclusively stack and infinite register when neither are graphs. Surely a tree is closer to a graph than a flat list of bytecode ops?!
Jan
4
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
1
comment What other programming languages run on PNaCl?
@JanusTroelsen: Ok, thanks. I am only interested in languages that compile to native code.
Dec
19
answered Why no Reference Counting + Garbage Collection in C#?
Dec
16
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
16
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
12
comment Choice of programming language for learning data structures and algorithms
@Pran: "I may be wrong, but aren't data structures and algorithms independent of the programming languages?". If the language doesn't provide a GC then you may have to write one.
Dec
12
comment Choice of programming language for learning data structures and algorithms
"data structures can be for all intents fully idependent of language". To implement most purely functional data structures in a language that does not provide garbage collection you will basically have to write a garbage collector. That is a serious impediment.
Dec
12
comment Choice of programming language for learning data structures and algorithms
GC is good but Java is pretty much the worse garbage collected language out there. A beginner will spend 99% of their time learning Java and only 1% learning data structures and algorithms. Just look how ugly a red-black tree is in Java...