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685187
bio website ffconsultancy.com
location Cambridge, United Kingdom
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visits member for 5 years, 10 months
seen Jul 23 at 10:53
Cofounder of Flying Frog Consultancy Ltd.

Apr
26
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
23
comment Haskell for the .net platform?
@ReiMiyasaka: I believe that is incorrect. The .NET JIT does TCO on x86, nothing to do with F#. It is required for tail calls to work correctly in the general case in F#. For example, see "The 32-bit JIT had a general purpose tail call mechanism that always worked" blogs.msdn.com/b/clrcodegeneration/archive/2009/05/11/…
Apr
21
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
13
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
12
comment Large-scale design in Haskell?
@tair: OCaml is not lazy. I studied several OSS Haskell code bases and didn't think laziness seemed particularly advantageous.
Apr
8
comment Large-scale design in Haskell?
@tair: "languages like Haskell, where code reuse and modularity is much more easy & safe". I find that statement odd when Haskell has only a vestigial module system compared to ML. Why are there at least two >1MLOC OCaml code bases in industry (Jane St. and Citrix) but no Haskell ones?
Apr
5
comment Scala versus F# question: how do they unify OO and FP paradigms?
@TimGoodman: Scala was not yet commercial when I wrote that (2010) but it is today. The JVM is a huge benefit for people implementing non-commercial languages because it provides high-quality garbage collectors that support multithreading. Standalone languages like OCaml and Python struggle with multithreading. Pattern matching and type inference are orthogonal to functional programming (e.g. Lisp has neither). Immutability is trivial in C#, just don't mutate! Lack of TCO so, for example, standard functional idioms like CPS are completely broken is a major flaw IMO.
Apr
5
comment Difference between concurrent programming and parallel programming
@TorValamo: I didn't see non-deterministic control flow vs throughput in your diagram.
Apr
5
comment Difference between concurrent programming and parallel programming
@acarlon: "How would you describe a time slicing algorithm in terms of determism/non-determinism? E.g. a single-core processor system that multi-tasks (time slices) to give the appearance of overlapping processing? When concurrency is defined as execution in overlapping time periods then this kind of multi-tasking is included in the definition for concurrency, but not parallelism.". Yes, that is concurrent and not parallel.
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
1
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
29
awarded  Great Answer
Mar
28
asked Display graphics inside the Visual Studio editor
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
answered Deciphering Type Explanations in F#
Mar
22
comment Are Exceptions in C++ really slow
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Do you accept that or not? Yes or no? cesura17.net/~will/professional/research/papers/tail.pdf
Mar
21
comment Are Exceptions in C++ really slow
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Do you accept that an unbounded number of calls in tail position can always be optimised to use a bounded amount of stack space as described in the paper I am referencing? cesura17.net/~will/professional/research/papers/tail.pdf
Mar
21
comment Are Exceptions in C++ really slow
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: "tail-recursion can often be optimized into a loop". In fact, an unbounded number of calls in tail position can always be optimised to use a bounded amount of stack space. Are you happy with that? cesura17.net/~will/professional/research/papers/tail.pdf
Mar
21
comment Are Exceptions in C++ really slow
So you are saying recursive calls always require a call stack?
Mar
21
comment Are Exceptions in C++ really slow
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: So you're still maintaining that Stackless Python either stack unwinds (even though it has no stack) or isn't Python (the clue is in the name)?