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Apr
19
comment Why is RAII and garbage collection mutually exclusive?
@Yttrill: Exactly but I think the underlying problem is that none of the people who use the word "determinism" in the context of garbage collection understand what that word actually means.
Apr
16
comment What kind of leaks does automatic reference counting in Objective-C not prevent or minimize?
@BradLarson: "you don't have the halting problems or sawtooth memory profiles experienced on garbage collected platforms". I'd expect worse halting and sawtooth memory profiles from scope-based reclamation and much worse performance from reference counting so I'd like to see a real comparison.
Apr
5
comment Efficient heaps in purely functional languages
@TheInternet: Ok. Parallelism should make it quite a bit faster but Haskell's safe approaches to parallelism will make it much slower.
Apr
4
comment Efficient heaps in purely functional languages
@TheInternet: Is that single threaded?
Mar
30
comment Can you repro this 64-bit .NET 4 GC bug?
@MaryEllenBench: The bug is fixed. I have no idea where the bug report is. I just wrote to Maoni Stephens at Microsoft and she fixed it immediately.
Mar
28
comment How does one implement hash tables in a functional language?
@ScottWest: "CLR only had one thread of execution so it didn't have to worry about it (I assume the mutators collect themselves but I'm not sure)". In point of fact, .NET stores a Dictionary<float, float> as a single contiguous block of memory with no unnecessary indirections due to boxing so it has nothing to collect by design (thanks to value types and reified generics). That is the main reason why it is faster than languages like OCaml and Haskell that box, allocate, traverse, copy and so on, all of which is completely unnecessary.
Mar
24
comment Struggling with closures and lifetimes in Rust
@FrancisGagné: Yes but a bitwise copy is just a constant factor faster whereas a purely functional Set is asymptotically faster because doesn't copy the elements, it just refers back to them. And Rc will be a lot slower than a tracing GC.
Mar
23
comment Struggling with closures and lifetimes in Rust
"However, HashSet does implement set-theoretic operations. There are two ways to use them: iterators (difference, symmetric_difference, intersection, union), which generate the sequence lazily, or operators (|, &, ^, -, as listed in the trait implementations for HashSet), which produce new sets containing clones of the values from the source sets". That's going to be really slow compared to a purely functional Set.
Mar
23
comment Struggling with closures and lifetimes in Rust
Fantastic, thank you both! :-)
Mar
13
comment When are higher kinded types useful?
@lobsterism: True but I think hardly anyone uses things like asyncSeq.
Mar
13
comment When are higher kinded types useful?
@J.Abrahamson: Sounds like a problem better solved by higher-order modules than higher kinds.
Mar
13
comment Does Scala support tail recursion optimization?
@Giorgio: Yes..
Mar
13
comment Does Scala support tail recursion optimization?
@Cubic: No, it was general tail calls. Arnold also implemented them in LLVM.
Mar
6
comment Conservative garbage collector
@HotLicks: That's only part of the solution. Given a (possibly interior) pointer to an object of unknown type, how do you determine whether or not it is "small" and (if applicable) which such bitvector to check?
Mar
2
comment How can I download HTML source in C#
Does that Dispose the WebClient?
Feb
20
comment Swift performance: sorting arrays
@JosephMark: How did you compile the C (compiler and settings)?
Feb
20
comment Swift performance: sorting arrays
@Macneil: Doesn't that assume tail call optimisation? I doubt Swift does TCO because it uses reference counting.
Feb
18
comment What is 'Pattern Matching' in functional languages?
@DavidMoles: I see what you mean. The difference is terminology: the parts of a union type are called type constructors and they are not regarded as types as they would be in other languages so that isn't technically testing types at runtime. The point here is that there is no implicit run time test for errors during dispatch. Static checking of errors but still dynamic dispatch.
Feb
17
comment What is 'Pattern Matching' in functional languages?
@DavidMoles: The type system makes it possible to elide all run-time checks by proving pattern matches to be exhaustive and not redundant. If you try to feed a language like SML, OCaml or F# a pattern match that is not exhaustive or contains redundancy then the compiler will warn you at compile time. This is an extremely powerful feature because it allows you to eliminate run-time checks by rearranging your code, i.e. you can have aspects of your code proven correct. Furthermore, it is easy to understand!
Feb
12
comment Are functional languages inherently slow?
I don't understand how that C code can be slower than OCaml bytecode interpreted by a C program because the latter must surely suffer from exactly the same aliasing problems?!