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location California
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visits member for 5 years, 3 months
seen Oct 6 at 23:46



Principal Web Ops Engineer at AppFolio, Inc. (SaaS!)

Expertise: Ruby, C, C++, Java, PHP, various frameworks, most scripting languages, consulting system administration and web engineering, embedded development. Digital circuit design and layout, specializing in signal integrity, programmable logic and simulation.

Some past appointments from my résumé...

  • NASA, JPL: Design Review Board, Mars Observer
  • The Eclipse Foundation: Director, Steward
  • The NetBSD Foundation: Director, Portmaster
  • The Lorraine Williams LaShelle Trust: Trustee
  • Avalon Computer Systems, Inc.: Director, Treasurer
  • The Xfree86 Project, Inc.: Developer

Mar
12
comment When to use nested classes and classes nested in modules?
@Pan, you are confusing Java inner classes and namespaced Ruby classes. A non-static Java nested class is called an inner class and it exists only within an instance of the outer class. There is a hidden field that allows outward references. The Ruby inner class is simply namespaced and is not "bound" to the enclosing class in any way. It is equivalent to a Java static (nested) class. Yes, the answer has a lot of votes but it is not completely accurate.
Jan
23
comment Maximum Java heap size of a 32-bit JVM on a 64-bit OS
@Ajax: read the question he said it's a 32-bit Java for political reasons. So he is limited to 4 GB for the sum total of Java + libraries + interpreter + all other sources of overhead. My point is that the limit he will hit will be somewhat different if he is on a 64-bit kernel vs a 32-bit kernel.
Jan
11
comment How to find shift/reduce conflict in this yacc file?
And all of this produces the exact same result as the original yacc. It might be useful to point out that the original conflict is expected and was correctly resolved by the yacc default of preferring the shift.
Jan
11
comment How to find shift/reduce conflict in this yacc file?
But ... but ... s/r conflicts are not bugs. It's true that marking specific conflicts would be preferable but the conflicts aren't exactly in the rules as such, they are in the generated state machine. So we kludge it with %expect. Welcome to the real world.
Dec
31
comment Is there a way to continue broken scp ( secure copy ) command process in Linux?
It's a reference to the man page, meaning it's in section 1. Sometimes the same page name appears in multiple sections, also, it's traditional to write it that way.
Dec
19
comment How to know if today's date is in a date range?
Ok, fixed for Ruby 2, will comment on why later.
Dec
18
comment Remove pattern from filenames
Well, good points, tho actually the question is not tagged bash.
Dec
18
comment Remove pattern from filenames
Well, this is the cleanest way. Although it is bash-specific and won't work in other shells, not even other Posix-style ones, that's probably OK these days. Everyone ships bash.
Dec
15
comment Run `git add -p` from ruby
I imagine that's happening because you are printing out what you got back from #expect.
Dec
15
comment Using selection in reduce block
What do you want to happen in the not-1-and-not-2 case? If throwing an exception is OK, I would do this: (1..10).reduce({1 => :+, 2 => :*}[choice]) or perhaps this: (1..10).reduce([nil, :+, :*][choice])
Dec
15
comment Run `git add -p` from ruby
BTW, you don't have to use a block with #expect ... you can just unconditionally call w.write which might make sense in your case. Be sure to consider using #expect's optional timeout parameter.
Dec
15
comment Run `git add -p` from ruby
1. IO#expect returns an Array which IO#puts handles more gracefully than Kernel#print does. 2. I guess you should loop unconditionally and call expect(s, 5) (5 second timeout) and then bail when you finally hit a timeout, unless you can detect the end with expect. 3. As a guess I would say you need another expect after the y because otherwise the exit may kill the git process before it can read and respond to the input you gave it. Without that you certainly have a race condition even if it usually works.
Jul
3
comment Configuring Git over SSH
Mac OSX also runs the ssh agent for you.
Jun
13
comment Does ftruncate() copy data if I truncate to a larger size than original?
@twalberg, you are technically correct, of course, but consider the context of SO and in particular a question specifically tagged with both linux and unix. I think it's reasonable to accurately generalize about native ffs/extN filesystems.
May
3
comment How is dynamically allocated memory kept track in C
Err, heh, I was trying to say something slightly different. Fixed!
May
3
comment Purpose of floating points in Ruby
Oh, don't close it, although not the ideal SO question, it seems OK. After all, most or all Javascript implementations do use only FP numerics. For that reason alone it seems like a fair enough question about programming.
May
3
comment Purpose of floating points in Ruby
@Jörg, well, that's true of the Ruby Integer class, but Lili never mentioned that. It seemed reasonable to interpret the question along the lines of why do we use the scalar operations and ignore the software-extended-range types. After all, Ruby could have implemented extended floats, or even used a hybrid approach with extended scaler ops. I rather doubt if Lili was talking about the non-Fixnum integers.
May
2
comment Ruby String Encode Consecutive Letter Frequency
Aha, deconstructing parameter assignment, nice.
Apr
28
comment Loop through an array, and check each item
@chris, updated...
Apr
23
comment How to sum columns with same date in Ruby
Roger, updated.