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Nov
27
revised Constantly read from NetworkStream async
added 5 characters in body
Nov
27
comment Constantly read from NetworkStream async
"burns CPU time": No, ReadByte() blocks until data is available. No CPU cycles wasted. However there is one context switch per byte, even though the bytes might arrive in bulk. There are ways to avoid this at the cost of complexity.
Nov
27
comment Constantly read from NetworkStream async
From what he's saying I understand that he dislikes that a thread from the threadpool is locked up forever. @DanielKelley: care to post descriptive/constructive comments?
Nov
25
revised Why isn't it possible to combine LINQ to XML with LINQ to SQL?
added 2 characters in body
Nov
25
answered Constantly read from NetworkStream async
Nov
25
answered LINQ Convert Dictionary to Lookup
Nov
25
comment Why isn't it possible to combine LINQ to XML with LINQ to SQL?
Yes. You don't need to know all the details about the Expression Trees (interesting stuff though). You just need to understand, that there is a difference between Func and Expression<Func>.
Nov
25
comment Why isn't it possible to combine LINQ to XML with LINQ to SQL?
The compiler sees that Domain is a DB context an therefore knows that the code inside the brackets must be translated to SQL via the Expression API. Google for the LINQ expression API to know more.
Nov
25
comment Why isn't it possible to combine LINQ to XML with LINQ to SQL?
The compiler infers from the context if a LINQ expression is to cast to a Expression<Func<...>> or just a plain vanilla Func<...>. Expressions<> are translated at runtime into some other language (SQL in this case) whereas Funcs are compiled normally.
Nov
25
answered Why isn't it possible to combine LINQ to XML with LINQ to SQL?
Nov
6
revised How to get the type of T from a generic List<T>
deleted 70 characters in body
Nov
4
awarded  Yearling
Jul
22
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
20
revised Split List into Sublists with LINQ
deleted 36 characters in body
May
20
comment Split List into Sublists with LINQ
@aolszowka: very valid points. I've added a warning and a usage section. The code assumes that you iterate over the inner enumerable. With your solution you forfeit the laziness though. I think it should be possible to get the best of both worlds with a custom, caching IEnumerator. If I find a solution I'll post it here...
May
20
revised Split List into Sublists with LINQ
Added warning and usage
May
14
comment Split List into Sublists with LINQ
@aolszowka: could you please elaborate?
May
12
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
17
awarded  Nice Answer