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May
30
awarded  Popular Question
May
27
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
@MikeMB: I work on a codebase that on some platforms needs to be compiled with GCC 4.4, which doesn't have supported for enum class.
May
26
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
If the enumeration is protected in the base class, it is accessible in the derived class. Again, this is the same as for any kind of member; enumerations are nothing special.
May
26
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
They are indeed not polymorphic, and cannot be overridden by derived classes. But they are still inherited in the sense that Derived::Waldo is valid and names the enumeration declared in the base class.
May
26
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
I'm not sure what you mean by "cannot happen with enumerations". What I described in my previous comment certainly can happen. Do I really need to write up example code to demonsrate?
May
26
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
@jeanDavy: protected makes it accessible to derived classes. Since the derived class already has access, it seems reasonable for the derived class to do what it wants with it, including give access to clients of the derived class. It works like this for other types of class members (such as methods), it's only enumerations that have the annoyance I describe.
May
26
comment Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
For example, I could have two classes Derived1 and Derived2 deriving from Base, each with a field of type Base::Waldo.
May
26
asked Exposing base class enum without tediously listing enumerators
May
22
awarded  Notable Question
May
22
comment Exceptions to the order of destruction for temporary objects?
Ok, I see. I wouldn't really consider those objects to be temporaries in this context. They are objects managed by the temporary list object, whose lifetime characteristics are defined by how the list object manages them (in this case, by dynamically allocating and deallocating them).
May
22
comment Exceptions to the order of destruction for temporary objects?
I'm not sure what you mean here. Could you give an example?
May
2
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
@luk32: Good point, thanks for pointing that out! (Did anyone suggest your comment was stupid?)
May
2
accepted How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
May
2
accepted How does input echoing work in a Linux terminal?
Apr
30
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
Right, but T creates a new object for the parameter (whether by copy or move), while in a member function you have to copy *this yourself.
Apr
30
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
Thanks! One small correction: "when implemented as a member, it acts as if the lhs is of type T" --> shouldn't that be "T& or const T& depending on whether the member function is const"?
Apr
30
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
@MooingDuck: Nice! Out of curiosity, is there a way to do it without declaring operator+ as a friend function in the class (since it doesn't actually need access to anything private or protected in the class)?
Apr
30
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
@MooingDuck: Whoops, you're right! The name of the class being T made be confuse T&& with a universal reference :)
Apr
30
revised How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
edited tags; edited title
Apr
30
comment How can I implement “op” in terms of “op=” in a CRTP base class?
@luk32: A member version of operator+ has to copy *this before calling operator+=, regardless whether *this is a temporary or not. A non-member version of operator+ taking its first argument by value avoids this copy in the event the first argument is temporary.