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Apr
29
comment C - determine if a number is prime
@Zboson: it's as fast on an architecture without pipelined divide, and it's no clearer (in my opinion, tastes may vary).
Apr
29
comment C - determine if a number is prime
@Zboson: If we really want to nitpick, number/i is strictly worse than (pre-computed) sqrt(number). number/i performs one additional unnecessary division. It also makes the loop condition depend on a long-latency operation; on an architecture with a pipelined divide, this could easily cause stalls due to limits on the number of unresolved branch predictions in flight at once.
Apr
28
comment What ABI, if any, restricts the size of [u]intmax_t?
@JensGustedt: I definitely didn't intend my list of affected components to be exhaustive =)
Apr
28
answered What ABI, if any, restricts the size of [u]intmax_t?
Apr
28
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
comment returning Z flag under ARM NEON
What Are You Really Trying To Do™? What's the purpose of this function? What are you going to do with the result?
Apr
22
comment Maintain precision when averaging floats
@MattDMo: Summing one hundred 1s and dividing by 100 is exactly correct. In general neither computation is exact, but in this case it is.
Apr
22
comment Maintain precision when averaging floats
If you're concerned about rounding errors from the accumulation, and don't know anything about the distribution of values a priori, it is better to use blocked accumulation (or Kahan summation) than an iterative average calculation.
Apr
22
comment Maintain precision when averaging floats
@MattDMo: No, they are not. Compare the result of summing one hundred 1/100ths (1.0000000000000007) and summing one hundred 1s and then dividing by 100 (1.0).
Apr
22
answered Maintain precision when averaging floats
Apr
21
comment iOS using vImage - Accelerate to convert QCAR YUV to RGB
Ian is the canonical authority on the subject of all things vImage. When he demands sacrifice, you find a goat.
Apr
21
answered NSLog matrix_float4x4 or simd::float4x4
Apr
20
comment What is theoretically the smallest floating point format possible?
You really need at least two exponent bits for IEEE-754 formats (otherwise you have no normal numbers, so it's just a fixed-point format with Inf and NaN tacked on). You need a signbit, and you need a significand bit in order to have NaNs. So in a meaningful sense, four bits is the minimum.
Apr
20
revised What is theoretically the smallest floating point format possible?
deleted 259 characters in body
Apr
20
revised What is theoretically the smallest floating point format possible?
added 42 characters in body
Apr
20
answered What is theoretically the smallest floating point format possible?
Apr
18
comment Are there compilers that optimise floating point operations for accuracy (as opposed to speed)?
@LưuVĩnhPhúc: FMA does indeed get you two roundings, but it actually makes the transform more dangerous in some ways: if a = -b, then x*(a+b) and x*a + x*b are exactly zero, but fma(x, a, x*b) is often not.
Apr
17
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
17
awarded  Nice Answer