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comment What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
The bigger picture here is that I am investigating the effectiveness of LP + MIP against a range of NP-hard problems. TSP is just one of them. In particular, I am trying to build an understanding of which problems have structure amenable to an approach like GLPK, and why. Thanks for the benchmark link - I may compare some other solvers. Unfortunately, each solver takes time to understand and learn its language, and for various reasons I am commited to using GLPK in a real-world application.
Aug
25
comment What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
Let me try and phrase it a different way. If GLPK can't natively (i.e. via a MathProg formulation) solve tours of 100 cities, then I'm interested in understanding why. In particular, is this a limitation of GLPK, or constraint solvers in general? According to my understanding of TSP, B+B plus cutting plane methods are a good approach. GLPK implements cutting planes via command line options. In practice however they seem to have limited effectiveness.
Aug
25
revised What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
linked to the code in question
Aug
25
comment What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
+1: Your answer is helpful, although not complete for what I'm asking. I've looked through the code for tspsol. It's written by the GLPK author, which provides some evidence that the solver alone cannot make significant progress against this problem. I also note that this is an example, rather than a custom solution. It uses basic branch and bound. See the comment at the top: Note that this program is only an illustrative example. It is not a state-of-the-art code, therefore only TSP instances of small size (perhaps not more than 100 cities) can be solved using this code.
Aug
25
comment What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
Oh, I know all about the complexity, as well as many of the possible heuristics. I have implemented simple heuristics in Python which can solve instances up to a few thousand cities. My question is whether GLPK, being a pure LP + MIP solver, can reasonably be expected to solve a (Euclidean) TSP of reasonable size. In my tests, it seems the mixed integer solver takes a very long time to converge. I wonder in particular whether it's possible to improve this aspect, perhaps with command line options. Or perhaps it is the formulation of the example I linked to which is at fault?
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asked What size tour can I reasonably expect to solve with GLPK?
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comment Disabling Python nosetests
Or you can just raise SkipTest at the start of your test. Note also that you can do from nose import SkipTest.
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