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Apr
28
comment Is dynamic scheduling better or static scheduling (Parallel Programming)?
It's a good first step to start experimenting, now you just have to try and understand the reason why dynamic scheduling is often preferred. Three are definitely problems where static scheduling is the way to go and n-body is a nice example of such a thing - in the best case dynamic scheduling will do as good as static scheduling, but not better. Question: How much does the running time differ between different iterations of your loop and why would that be important?
Apr
27
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
23
comment Reverse string without strrev
@prehfeldt fun fact: doing the xor swap is way, way slower than the obvious code. Penny wise and pound foolish
Apr
23
comment Is incrementing a null pointer well-defined?
@ddriver If you think that UB can only make problems if it would make "sense" according to the used architecture, you're at least ten years behind on compilers. Example: x86 has 2s complement arithmetic, so int overflows(int x) { return x + 1 < x;} should always give you the right result, right? On modern gccs you have a good chance that the function will be optimized to return false.
Apr
23
comment Antroid 5 bitmap drawing trouble
@Gennady There's an obvious race condition there: T1 draws bitmap 0 and calls invalidate. T1 draws bitmap 1 and calls invalidate again. T1 starts working on bitmap 0. T0 uses bitmap 0 and conflicts with T1. And that assumes nothing can cause onDraw to be called except the invalidate in your own code.
Apr
23
comment Antroid 5 bitmap drawing trouble
You're overwriting the bitmap while the GUI thread is using it, that can't be good and android 5 is probably just handling that more correctly by locking somewhere. Just wait for the GUI thread to finish its intervention before reusing the bitmap. If nothing else you'll do less useless work
Apr
22
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
21
comment Duplicate math result in Bakery Algorithm (C# code)
@Luaan my point was that since all of the randomness in this use case of the GUID comes from a random generator you can just cut out the middleman. If the normal random generator isn't good enough, by all means use a cryptographically secure version. Extra advantage is that you know exactly what you'll get, but the GUID can avoid having to handle shared state yourself - that's a plus.
Apr
21
comment Duplicate math result in Bakery Algorithm (C# code)
@Luaan If you use a non broken random generator this will be perfectly fine. Heck random GUIDs (not sure which type is generated by default) just use a random generator themselves as part of the process (and the other parts are machine dependent so will be identical). No this should be perfectly fine as far as I can see - humans are bad judges about randomness. If you want to quantify your feelings run a chi square test or other simple statistical tests.
Apr
20
comment Duplicate math result in Bakery Algorithm (C# code)
Instead of the horrible hack to sleep to get different random seeds, just use a single random generator that generates the seeds for the thread's random generator.
Apr
20
comment Why thread need to disable interrupts to implement lock?
It's not even a possibility on any multicore CPU because.. well multiple cores.
Apr
19
comment Boolean array reordering in O(1) space and O(n) time
@Ricky Yes it all depends on what computation model you want to use. It turns out that for a large variety of algorithms assuming that single integers take O(1) space and O(1) time for simple arithmetic operations is the most useful. Hence for many problems assuming that reduce(arr, (t, e) -> t + e) being O(n) is perfectly fine, although yes you could also go with O(nm) with m being the bit size - and for some problems this will indeed make a big difference.
Apr
19
comment Boolean array reordering in O(1) space and O(n) time
@Ricky Don't fall into this trap. In any case we are talking about Java so ints (and array sizes) are limited to 32bit, so assuming constant time for operations on and memory for single numbers is both more useful and simpler.
Apr
17
comment Terminating thread on DLL unload
Good question, but I just won't get around to properly answering it. See this post by Raymond Chen on the problem. The basic idea is to increase the ref count of your dll before starting a thread. That avoids the problem if you getting unloaded while a thread is running but opens up new problems - see Raymond's post for how to handle those.
Apr
11
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@HarryJohnston But then every linked list is fixed size and since the last element has to be different, it's now not an infinitely recursive definition anymore. For the pointer case we'd need an arbitrary length encoding for the pointers to get around this but it'd be possible.
Apr
10
comment Ternary operator in Java only evaluating one expression since Java 7 - was that different in Java 1.6 and lower?
The numbers of badly written (or just flat out wrong) questions in these Oracle certifications is astonishing every time again..
Apr
10
accepted scanf %d segfault at large input
Apr
10
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@benjamin I actually pointed out (because I knew otherwise someone would bring this up - well didn't help) that Haskell allocated the thunks at creation time and hence this works because those thunks give us the indirection we need. This is nothing but a pointer with extra data in disguise...
Apr
10
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@DavidK Give me the mathematical definition of the structure then that doesn't have an infinite recursion in it. If you can do that, you've shown that it's at least theoretically possible to do so (if I have way too much free time tonight I might just prove this is impossible..). Lazy evaluation has nothing to do with this in any case (I've programmed in Haskell in the past, it's not like the concept is foreign to me) - you still allocate space for the thunk at creation (and that's where the indirection comes into place again).
Apr
10
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@David I'm confused. First you agree that it is logically impossible, but then you want to contemplate it? Remove anything of C or C++ - it's impossible in any language you could ever dream up as far as I can see. That structure is by definition an infinite recursion and without some level of indirection we cannot break that.