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Oct
27
comment why does the code output -1 in place of 1
This is what the standard C99 says about char:The three types char, signed char, and unsigned char are collectively called the character types. The implementation shall define char to have the same range, representation, and behavior as either signed char or unsigned char.
Oct
27
comment why does the code output -1 in place of 1
-1 No he hasn't inserted -1, 0, 1 in the bitfield, his bitfield represents only 2 values -1 and 0. Nothing more, nothing less. On another compiler he may have gotten 0 and 1. This is a choice of the compiler char is either signed or unsigned. This is the reason why one should be careful when indexing with charvariables as they may sign extend and break code (gnu C warns for example when using something like isalpha(c) for that reason).
Oct
27
comment why does the code output -1 in place of 1
No, bitfields can be signed or unsigned, it depends on what you want to do, there's no rule for that.
Oct
27
comment why does the code output -1 in place of 1
sandeep it has nothing to do with the endianness, it really depends on the choice of the compiler to consider char signed or unsigned. Some compiler have even a command line option to choose (Microsoft compilers if I remember correctly).
Oct
27
answered why does the code output -1 in place of 1
Oct
26
comment Sleeping in a Thread (C / POSIX Threads)
Read the article linked? Semaphore are for signaling also, it's not because most people misuse them as mutexes that they can not be used for their true purpose.
Oct
25
answered Sleeping in a Thread (C / POSIX Threads)
Oct
24
comment One large malloc versus multiple smaller reallocs
You can also look the code of realloc on Solaris, you will see that it will copy the block and does not use vmm tricks, which is logical as most implementations of malloc et al. are in user space, vmm tricks would imply switching to kernel mode. The copying is often avoided by overallocating the blocks in the first place. For small blocks it allocates 100% more, for big blocks 50%.
Oct
24
comment Is there a printf converter to print in binary format?
And has the advantage also to be invocable multiple times in a printf which the ones with static buffers can't.
Oct
24
comment C negative array index
+1 for actually coming up for a good reason why it's poor programming practice (imho undefined behaviour is a little short as explanation, several cases of ub in the standard are only put there to allow for truely exotic hardware and are in practice not important).
Oct
23
answered Delete End of File
Oct
22
comment malloc vs mmap in C
mmap allows for other uses also, like building a shared memory area with which your process can communicate with forked precesses.
Oct
22
comment malloc vs mmap in C
Normally the allocator will use mmap itself depending on the size of the area asked with malloc. On Solaris when asking for more than 128K you will get a MAP_ANON memory mapped block. On OS/X the limit is 64K if I remember correctly, other systems and allocation libraries will have other values.
Oct
22
comment malloc vs mmap in C
To add to that, fread is buffered this means that if it is preceded by a fseek it will always fill his buffer completely. I had a program that read a file sequentially but preceding a fseek before every record (of size 32) reading 8192 bytes. So it ended up reading 256 times more data than necessary, plus reading was always two calls to the kernel. With mmap you have none (visible).
Oct
21
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
Btw don't forget to mark the question as answered.
Oct
21
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
Sorry, I'm not in charge of installing the software on ou servers, so I'm totally ignorant on that.
Oct
20
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
Ok, now I understand, you want to run a 32bit proc binary. Why? There's no point in that. The preprocessor doesn't care if you want to make your binaries 32bit or 64bit. The difference in performance would be negligible. This said, the problem comes from the LD_LIBRARY_PATHwhich will be invoked before the normal luist of library directories and the oracle tools will also find their symbols in them. You have to give the lib32 path on the linker line of you makefile and also when you run your app, but not at the time of invocation of proc.
Oct
19
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
That's strange as the error message tells that the Oracle library linked is 32 bit (ELFCLASS32). Could you give the options with which you compile your binaries?
Oct
19
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
To make it short, your problem comes from your binaries, not the Oracle libs as they are 32bit, that's what the message says.
Oct
19
comment Issues with building PROC application using Oracle 10g 64 bit
Then it means that you have to compile your code in 32bit mode. By default gcc and Sunstudio build 32bit code. On gcc and newer versions of the cc you have to explicitly give an option -m64 to compile in 64bit.