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Mar
12
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
25
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
21
accepted Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
Nov
21
comment Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
ok, this is weird. I undid the rebase (to get a copy of the file) and started it again. When it bombed out I copied the file back in then hit to restart the rebase. Deleted it again. I then replaced the file while leaving the prompt to start the diffmerge tool open, this allowed diffmerge to actually launch... but when I tell the diffmerge to save (after resolving differences) it deletes the file and creates another .merge.# file. At this point it's looking like it's a diffmerge issue and not a clearcase issue.
Nov
21
comment Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
VonC, sorry for delays in responding, I'm in and out of meetings all day. That said, I attempted another rebase running cleartool ls frequently while watching the progression of the rebase. It appears to checkout the file fine, then the file disappears when the diffmerge tool attempts to start (and that's when the next merge.# shows up). Next break I get I'll attempt to copy the file in from a temp dir after it's removed and see what happens.
Nov
21
comment Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
Von, appreciate the help. I provided the results of running cleartool ls, I am seeing the checked out but removed status as you surmised. I'll be googling possible causes a bit later today, but if you have any further insight I'd be appreciative. Thanks!
Nov
21
revised Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
provided requested information
Nov
21
asked Clearcase UCM: rebase fails - error (apparently) is a lie - what's the root cause?
Aug
10
awarded  Supporter
Aug
10
accepted Enum<? extends interface>
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
@Havard, depends on how the interface is being used. The int ordinal() can be placed in the original Fooable interface but if that Fooable interface were being made use of elsewhere without the requirement to be an enum that I'm attempting to impose here having the second interface as done here could be useful. In my case I'll likely be combining the two; but having it shown seperately was advantageous.
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
@Mike, more I think on this the more I think it's the correct path. My requirement isn't really that the type is an enumm, it's that it has the behavior of an enum. I've also convinced myself that the values() thing isn't going to be a problem and was me being silly.
Aug
10
awarded  Commentator
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
Consider the following line T fe2 = fe.someOtherCommonMethod(); Even without considering things like covariant return types, I'm pretty sure that type erasure will result in the runtime being unable to ensure that the type returned by someOtherCommonMethod() matches the type T. Or am I mistaken on this?
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
I'd thought about this, but I had reservations about it's behavior with respect to values(), may be worth revisiting though as right now I'm not able to dredge up a valid reservation...
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
Unfortunantly this looks like it just creates additional unchecked casts in my codebase, namely some of the methods on the Fooable interface return enumerations that would then be assigned to a variable of type T... and due to type erasure this requires an unchecked cast. It does look like it'd provide for enforcing the dual constraint at compile time though... gonna have to think about this.
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
Hadn't thought of that approach... had experimented with having the interface generic with a T extends Enum<T> & Fooable<T>, but may have to go poke around with making the enclosing class generic so that all of it's methods can have a T with both constraints...
Aug
10
comment Enum<? extends interface>
yeah, but my understanding is that's only for use when declaring a generic not defining a parameter to a method?
Aug
10
revised Enum<? extends interface>
added a java tag; added 4 characters in body