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seen Jun 21 '13 at 9:20

May
24
comment Return to function, difference between strcpy() and memcpy()
overflow is properly terminated in rettofunc1.c. The other statement is just a way to determine if the pointers contain null bytes (which is the case for 64-bit).
Apr
2
comment Binary enviornment variables and setenv()
Yeah, you're right. Thanks again, that seems to make it work in my original toy-program too. The program I pasted here was just something to demonstrate the "problem" in general.
Apr
2
comment Binary enviornment variables and setenv()
Thanks, what should I set $IFS to in order to get this behavior though? Currently $IFS is not set, I tried just declaring it with no content.
Mar
7
comment ASLR affected by entropy available on Linux?
Can you reproduce the behavior where I observe the entropy getting depleted just by catting entropy_avail? I kill most running processes, do a find to make sure the entropy is high, then I cat /proc/sys/kernel/entropy_avail and see that this number decreases for each execution of cat.
Mar
7
comment ASLR affected by entropy available on Linux?
Interesting, then why do I observe a decreasing entropy_avail when I repeatedly cat the file?
Nov
4
comment Segfault shows up only in GDB
I printed it by actually executing the program though.
Nov
4
comment Segfault shows up only in GDB
Thanks for the input. I have already verified that I get a consistent address of ESP when I print it though. I don't think the reason the behavior I'm seeing is that the stack keeps shifting around; then I would expect to see that I don't always get consistent ESP values.
Nov
4
comment Segfault shows up only in GDB
Why should the address be relative to some offset?
Nov
4
comment Segfault shows up only in GDB
The return address is stored at 0xbffff2d4, every time, according to GDB. If I enabled ASLR then that obviously would change. It will also be different on a different computer.
Nov
2
comment x86-64 function prologue
When I compile with gcc -S to get assembly output I simply see reproduced results.
Nov
2
comment x86-64 function prologue
It probably saves EDI and RSI simply because it is not required to save these by the caller? But still the manner in which they are saved seems weird.
Oct
25
comment Determine time required to start a program in GNU/Linux?
Sorry, the hardware is x86-64. I forgot to add that in the question.
Oct
18
comment Patching an ELF file
ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), not stripped
Oct
18
comment What happened to _start and the arguments of __libc_start_main on 64-bit Linux?
Compiling the program with -m32 on my system gives me similar disassembly as in the linked tutorial.
Oct
5
comment ASLR limitations on Linux
I managed to overlook that, sorry about that. I have gone through my four earlier questions and made corrections. Thanks.
Oct
2
comment Patching an ELF file
Ah, of course. Thanks for the input. I was just doing this on a simple hello world program actually; I wouldn't have thought it could mess up some relative offsets in the init code or something like that. I get a fault in: 0x00000000004005f0 in __libc_csu_init () => 0x00000000004005f0 <__libc_csu_init+0>: 6c ins BYTE PTR es:[rdi],dx I don't see how any relative offsets that might be prior to main would be affected by the size of main?
Aug
3
comment Reading dmesg from a kernel module
Thanks! Is it possible to do this without having to recompile the kernel? Surely there must be some standard feature to do this with that exists in all normal kernels? Incidentally, I get unknown symbol for sys_read() and sys_open() too.