3,553 reputation
1631
bio website adisakp.blogspot.com
location Chicago, IL
age 43
visits member for 6 years, 3 months
seen Dec 17 at 22:45

I have been programming Video Games since I was a teenager in the 1980's and it's been my full-time job since the early 90's.

I currently work on the Mortal Kombat Team at Netherrealm Studios in Chicago owned by WB Games (our studio was Midway Games Chicago until Warner Brothers purchased it in the summer of 2009).

You can find me on facebook as well. Additionally I have an e-mail account at that well-known Google-Mail address with the same user name as on here.


Oct
26
comment Branchless code that maps zero, negative, and positive to 0, 1, 2
@AudreyT: Even though it's "branchless" at the language level, anytime you use comparison operators, you are potentially introducing branches at the machine compilation level.
Oct
26
comment Fighting fragmentation in custom memory manager
BTW, how do you make dlmalloc wait-free without a major rewrite? I can understand making the small allocs in dlmalloc lock free using SLIST (Atomic list) primitives since they are just size-binned freelists but waitfree is a bit more difficult. Also, you have to be very carefully if you are trimming (returning memory to the OS) with lock-free and wait-free methods unless you use hazard pointers or garbage collection to avoid the race condition where you can dereferencing linked nodes that have been freed back to the OS.
Oct
26
comment Fighting fragmentation in custom memory manager
FWIW, dlmalloc is quite mature. Doug Lea has been working on it since 1987. Furthermore, he was the primary maintainer of the GNU C++ library (libg++). If you use the "standard" malloc in many C and C++ libraries, you are already using dlmalloc.
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
@Mohamed: Yes, if you have large arrays, then using smaller ints will save memory.
Oct
25
answered malloc zeroing out memory?
Oct
25
comment Why is 49, 50, 51, 52 stored in the array when I declare testArray[] = {'1','2','3','4','5'}? (C programming)
A explanation of pmg's short comment: If that is a string array (char *'s to zero terminated char arrays), you should be initializing with strings using double quotes rather than with the single quote: "1" not '1'. Also as people mentioned, the values (49,...) are ASCII and will be output correctly when you use printf or any other string output function.
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
+1 for the calculation widening explanation.
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
@Henk: I stand corrected on the sbyte assertion. It's good to learn something new every day.
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
BTW, I didn't down or up vote you.... I'm merely commenting... but my guess on the downvote is that your answer was not entirely correct on the performance assertions. Also, you can save lots of memory on structures that are not just in arrays or lists. For example, we work on games with large 3D worlds with literally tens or hundreds of thousands of objects loosely connected in a directed graph (one of our games loads about 200,000 objects). Variable sizes there really do matter for performance and memory.
Oct
25
comment Is there a bandwidth improvement from installing a 32-bit operating system on a 64-bit machine?
@Brian: Also, 16-bit code was a bit of a nightmare because it did not use a linear address space. It had to use a lot of extra code for segment registers. Additionally, the CPU had to do a very slow mode switch between the 32-bit linear addressed OS system mode and 16-bit segment addressed user mode. The switch between 32-bit and 64-bit linear modes was designed to be much faster on current CPUs because a majority of software is still 32-bit.
Oct
25
comment C++ - Pointer to a class method
@San: Member function pointers (MFP's) are handled differently from normal functions pointers because they ARE different... it's not just syntactic sugar. The size of MFP's are often larger (8 or 12 bytes vs 4 on 32-bit machines), they pass an implicit this pointer, often they call through a small chunk of thunking code rather than directly (so they can possibly invoke virtual functions). So they are both more expensive memory-wise and for CPU-performance (cost to invoke) than a normal function pointer.
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
BTW, here's an article called 'Mastering Structs in C#' describing in depth EXACTLY what I was saying about grouping like-sized variables: vsj.co.uk/articles/display.asp?id=501
Oct
25
comment Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
FWIW, on a PC in 32-bit mode, 16-bit ints can actually be a tiny bit slower than 32-bit ints because the machine opcodes actually require an extra byte to specify that they use 16-bit operands. So for local variables use the native int type if it works for you. Again, for structures, to save memory, use whatever the smallest size works. You may want to group member variables by like sizes though so you don't waste space with padding between different sized member variables.
Oct
25
answered Why use integers smaller than 32bit?
Oct
25
comment How do threaded systems cope with shared data being being cached by different cpus?
FWIW, for a simple spin lock, you can peform LOCK as an atomic-xchg to set an ownership flag followed by a read (aquire) memory barrier. UNLOCK can be a write (release) barrier followed by a non-atomic write to cleare the ownership flag. In no way is a cache-flush required. On X86, where memory barriers are implicit, you need only a single atomic operation.
Oct
23
answered Uses of C comma operator
Oct
23
comment Mis-aligned pointers on x86
Minor correction to "interlocked operations must operate on aligned data to ensure they are atomic on multiprocessor systems". Interlocked operations will work on unaligned data on X86, they just happen to have edge cases that are MUCH slower but your code shouldn't crash. FWIW, you don't have to use full alignment for interlocked operations on some PowerPC's as well (for example a certain game system made by Microsoft will handle 64-bit interlocks that are only 32-bit aligned just fine).
Oct
23
comment How does casting a function actually work in C?
FWIW, changing the number of parameters will not work on certain ABI's. For example, the Windows Win32 "stdcall" ABI specifies that the caller pushes values onto the stack but the callee pops the stack when it returns. If the number of parameters varies, you will corrupt the stack pointer by casting a pointer to a function with a different number of paramters than specified in the signature for the function pointer type. If you're going to try to be "clever" doing this, you need to specify functions as "cdecl" on Windows.
Oct
23
comment In C++, what's the use of having a function void foo(int** p)?
FWIW, the template C++ version is this: template<int R,int C> void foo(int (&p)[R][C]) where R and C are Rows and Columns.
Oct
23
revised In C++, what's the use of having a function void foo(int** p)?
added 941 characters in body; edited body