3,333 reputation
1230
bio website adisakp.blogspot.com
location Chicago, IL
age 43
visits member for 5 years, 10 months
seen 5 hours ago

I have been programming Video Games since I was a teenager in the 1980's and it's been my full-time job since the early 90's.

I currently work on the Mortal Kombat Team at Netherrealm Studios in Chicago owned by WB Games (our studio was Midway Games Chicago until Warner Brothers purchased it in the summer of 2009).

You can find me on facebook as well. Additionally I have an e-mail account at that well-known Google-Mail address with the same user name as on here.


May
4
comment Can someone explain this C++ comma operator short-circuiting example?
Great... I knew there was some limitation where you couldn't do it with purely intrinsic types. Thanks for clearing that up.
May
4
comment Can someone explain this C++ comma operator short-circuiting example?
Can the comma operator be overloaded for intrinsic types like "bool" or "int"? Or can you only do it with classes.
May
4
comment Can someone explain this C++ comma operator short-circuiting example?
Ah, a case where the added parenthesis explain all!
Apr
28
comment Is there an 8-bit atomic CAS (cmpxchg) intrinsic for X64 in Visual C++?
What register is the return variable for a 64-bit asm function ?
Nov
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@Supercat: Newer ARM chips handle Thumb Instructions at full speed... sometimes they even run faster because they take less room in the instruction cache so you get more cache hits. The only caveat is branch targets should be 32-bit aligned or you may take a hit on decoding.
Nov
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@Jeremy: Well, this is a simple case of selection between two values. It's merely finding the criteria to generate a binary mask for the condition that selects one of the two values then use the mask to select the value. That's a pretty simple approach. Most of the time, the same algorithm or one with very simple modifications can be applied to do in parallel. I didn't show that but the unrolling example I do show is fairly trivial as well.
Oct
19
comment Script to insert logging into every function in a project?
You do not need a separate module for the prolog/epilog functions. Both functions '_penter()' and '_pexit()' are to be defined like this: 'extern "C" void __declspec(naked) _cdecl _penter( void )'. Naked functions are not instrumented so there is no chance of recursion. You do have to worry about recursion on children functions but that can be solved using a thread local variable check to early out in _penter() and _pexit() before calling any children.
Oct
13
comment Can MSVC _penter and _pexit hooks be disabled on a per function basis?
Yeah... I didn't see another way to do it myself. But it can't hurt to ask.
Oct
13
comment Can MSVC _penter and _pexit hooks be disabled on a per function basis?
I was hoping for a simple thing like __declspec(dontinstrument) or something like that.
Oct
10
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
You could mask on the high bit and use that as a pass-thru selection and then it would work for all values 0-255. But if you knew your ASCII, was 0-127 you could skip the extra work :-)
Oct
10
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: The if-then ("IT") instruction is the ARM version of predicates. It determines if the next N instructions execute based on CPU flags without branching. I think we're talking about the same thing. The IT instruction is part of Thumb-2 IS. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture "IT" (if-then) instruction, which permits up to four successive instructions to execute based on a tested condition.
Oct
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: Oh, and the "IT" instruction on ARM is the rare exception where all the good compilers actually normally do generate a predicate instruction. They seem to not do it on X86 so much though :-(
Oct
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
OK, actually tested supercat's code in a compiler (best way to verify stuff). It works. I thought the promotion to integer was a new feature in C# but apparently it's been around forever in C/C++ as well. It's good to learn something new everyday. I've always just explicitly promoted (by casting) when I need an operation to be a larger size.
Oct
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: Yeah, I like the ARM "IT" (if-then) instruction which has a fast predicate to skip a couple following instructions. It's still worth knowing that on all superscalar pipelined ARM architectures, the interleaved branchfree version will be 3-4X faster than a version using IT instructions. That's before using SWAR/SIMD. Using 32-bit SWAR with branchfree, it will be 12-16X faster for the heart of the unrolled loop. Of course, with loop unrolling, you need loop prolog/epilogs so it might be worthwhile having short strings go through an "IT" path and long strings go through mine.
Oct
9
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: No reason in theory a compiler shouldn't do that optimization. However, in practice, most compilers that I have used do not :-( To avoid the gap between theory and practice, if you want branchfree code in real world practice (rather than in theory), you need to write it so the compiler CAN NOT generate a branch -- not to write it so the compiler might be optimize out a branch. Branch free is a huge win on the optimization of this code. If you look at my post, I actually have a snapshot of asm output from a compiler showing how well interleaving works with branchfree.
Oct
8
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: The answer I provide isn't "silly", it's pretty standard for branchfree C/C++ techniques and will generate pretty good code on any modern compiler. Of course there are times to use branching code rather than branchfree... for example on a very old-school unpipelined CPU which has no prefetch and no branch mispredict penalty and also is missing a barrel shifter -- in this case branching will always be faster. It's always best to time things and look at compiler output but I've found branchfree code to be very fast in general.
Oct
8
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: BTW, the branchfree version you have in your reply won't work. The expression prior to shifting is an unsigned char and >>8 results in 0 for all unsigned chars.
Oct
8
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: If someone asks for an "optimal" function, I'm never comfortable leaving the actual performance in the hands of a possible magic compiiler optimization that might happen on some CPU's -- especially when I've noticed compilers don't generally perform that optimization for you.
Oct
8
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@supercat: Yes some CPUs have predicate generation instructions and some have conditional selection as well. Even the modern X86 instruction set has been expanded to include some of these instructions. However, none of the common compilers use them :( You have to write asm for most of them. The thing about writing branchfree code is that it will generate code without branches even if your compiler is not smart enough to do so for you. This is necessary for the compiler to automatically unrolling and interleave loops. Also, it's necessary to use this technique to expand to SIMD.
Oct
7
comment How could these case conversion functions be improved?
@R..: Yeah, I'm pretty sure that the version I wrote had the minimum number of ops for branchfree. That's why I double-checked yours when it had one less. If you find a faster version, let me know. FWIW, I still prefer using an 'and' rather than the extra shift because due to barrel-shifter costs, some platforms only allow shift instructions to be issued from a particular pipeline slot (i.e. Atom) which makes interleaved unrolled versions (generated by some compilers) more likely to have stalls.