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Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
@DonnyD: Brilliant. I just got 11 upvotes for an answer that is wrong and you're the first to notice ;-) Fix coming up.
Jul
4
revised Type erasure, overriding and generics
deleted 7 characters in body
Jul
4
comment PHP conditional string replacement
This would also replace the ~ in "~la]", i.e. it does not require an opening bracket to occur before the tilde. That's probably not a problem though, so +1.
Jul
4
revised Ruby flow control
added 124 characters in body
Jul
4
answered Ruby flow control
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
I don't agree with this. A function is something that can be applied. You can't apply a string. Anything that does not match the type a -> b (for some a and b) is not a function.
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
... Yes, Either is a way to work around the fact, that you can't return multiple types, but it's still fully statically typed. It's different from variant types in that you can't possibly define an Either-equivalent that behaves badly or get a foo out of an Either that contains a Bar without the compiler noticing.
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
@JonathanAllen: If I do case x of Left a ... I'm not expecting the type of x. The type of x is Either foo bar, I know that, there's no need to inspect that. I'm inspecting the contents of x. The same is true for variant types in a way, but the variant may contain a void pointer, which you would not statically know the type of. Either way when I talked about "runtime type inspection" I was talking about reflection in the Java/C# sense, not about "handmade" workarounds, which exist only because C you can't inspect a value's type at runtime...
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
4
revised Sorting ArrayList of String[]
added 138 characters in body
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
You're still applying the function, not returning one. (Also note that this causes an infinite loop if you call foo with an odd argument or foo2 with an even argument (or either with a negative one, but that's not new)).
Jul
4
comment Sorting ArrayList of String[]
@StephenC: Ok, I edited to use an if-statement instead.
Jul
4
revised Sorting ArrayList of String[]
added 186 characters in body
Jul
4
comment Sorting ArrayList of String[]
@khan0: You need to put it inside a method.
Jul
4
revised Sorting ArrayList of String[]
added 868 characters in body; added 81 characters in body
Jul
4
comment Sorting ArrayList of String[]
I still need to see the code you're trying to compile. It looks like you put the call to sort somewhere where expressions aren't syntactically valid (like outside a method definition for example).
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
@camccann: foo instanceof Bar in java makes sense if and only if the static type of foo is a supertype of Bar. Otherwise it would always be false. In haskell foo instanceof Bar would always return true (in case where the static type of foo is Bar) or always return false (in case it's not). Neither of which would be useful. The point is in java you don't know whether a variable of type Object really contains a String or an ArrayList (as an example). In haskell you always know the type, so you don't need to check it.
Jul
4
comment Sorting ArrayList of String[]
@khan0: It's not because you're importing java.util.*. That's fine. Please edit your question to show the whole code that causes the error and the error message. And your java version.
Jul
4
answered Sorting ArrayList of String[]
Jul
4
comment Haskell: Functions that sometimes return a function
@camccann: I'd consider that a consequence of the lack of subtyping. It makes no sense to inspect a value's type at runtime if the type is already fully known at compile time.