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I am currently working towards a PhD in microbial genetics. Before that I spent a bit over a decade working as a programmer, with most of that time spent writing computer games. I have degrees in Mathematics (MMath), Life Sciences (BSc) and Molecular Genetics (MSc).


Jun
16
comment Making all mathematical operators of a struct manipulate the same member
I strongly recommend you don't do this. Implicit conversions of this type are an accident waiting to happen. You think you're being clever and it works lovely for a while but eventually it ends up being a rabbit hole you don't want to go down.
Jun
16
comment Saving grid.arrange() plot to file
Whilst trying to make it work I figured it out.
Jun
16
revised Where the C macros stored in memory and how does it consumes more memory compared to functions?
added 469 characters in body
Jun
16
answered Where the C macros stored in memory and how does it consumes more memory compared to functions?
Jun
16
comment Saving grid.arrange() plot to file
When I try this I get an error telling me that g is not of the right type?
Jun
16
answered How do I change the formatting of numbers on an axis with ggplot?
Jun
15
comment How can I set axis ranges in ggplot2 when using a log scale?
How did you get the values on the y-axis to be expressed with superscripts like that?
Jun
15
answered Elif-row without else python
Jun
15
answered What is the need of deallocating memory in C?
Jun
15
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@jaymmer: Not really, no, because - apart from anything else - that's a really poor way to design a general purpose memory manager. I've written managers that work that way in C++, but it's only worth deploying them for small sized allocations for the general case it's just woefully inefficient at managing the available memory without fragmentation in the general case and since malloc and free are designed to be general case managers it does not make sense for them to work this way.
Jun
14
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
This is not "primarily opinion based" there are a whole load of important, practical design resigns why not passing the size is a much better way to do. Just read the answers given and this becomes clear, especially that from Nathaniel J. Smith.
Jun
14
revised Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
added 3247 characters in body
Jun
14
answered Are Constructors not members of a class?
Jun
14
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
std::allocator allocates only elements of a specific, known size. It is not a general purpose allocator, the comparison is apples to oranges.
Jun
14
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: Your grasp of this is clearly too poor for it to be worth wasting more time on this. Everyone else, have a little think about how a general purpose memory allocator might differ from one that only allocates a specific type of known size and thus why Mehrdad's argument regarding std::allocator is absurd.
Jun
14
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: No, it doesn't. Do you not even read what the things you linked to? The second argument is the number of elements allocated not the size of memory allocated.
Jun
14
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: Have you ever actually either written or even looked at a real memory manager? It is very common for memory managers to actually return a block of memory that is a different size from the requested block for a whole host of efficiency and alignment reasons. This means that the asked for size is completely useless for the free call, to be any use at all the malloc must return the actually allocated size and the free call pass back this actually allocated size. Without this it is just a completely useless piece of information that will inevitably slow things down.
Jun
13
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: If you require the size to be sent to free you require the caller the track it. If the memory manager in many, most, or even a significant proportion of cases ignores the information then you have a setup that is strictly inferior to not having that information included.
Jun
13
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: How much extra memory is required and when is an implementation issue that depends on the memory manager. You cannot, therefore, write code that assumes that the memory you get back is the size you ask for. This means that you're automatically putting the burden to track size onto the caller. You cannot just assume that the sizes are the same. This is transparent in the system as designed but requires effort from the caller in a pass-the-size-with-free system.
Jun
13
comment Why does `free` in C not take the number of bytes to be freed?
@Mehrdad: Oh, and on #3, no it doesn't require extra information, it does require extra memory. A typical memory manager that's designed to work with 16 byte alignment will return a pointer to a 128 byte block when asked for a 115 byte block. If the free call is to correctly pass the size to be freed it must know this.