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Jul
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comment Comparing 2 Regular Expression Strings
This solution is incorrect. If str1 is 1(*)1 and str2 is 1(*)1 then the first if block would modify them to str1 = 11 str2 = 1*)1. Second if statement would do nothing and the last one would conclude they're not equal. There are also errors if there are multiple (.) in either string. Or if str1 = (.)11 str2 = 111 as the str2.replace would replace all the ones in str2 with empty string.
Jul
1
comment Comparing 2 Regular Expression Strings
There is no exact description of what you want to do, except some random examples. You should first specify in words what you want to do. Is the last column the answer to the question "Is it possible to construct one string which will match both the left and the right regexes?". If so, you should clarify that.
May
8
comment Java convert bytes[] to File
If you want a file in memory, typically you read the file from disk and write it into a byte array using a ByteArrayOutputStream. This way, you have a representation of the file in memory, and it is in the form of a byte array. You seem to already have this. What is the reason for which you want it in some other format?
Apr
23
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Good Question
Feb
19
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Jan
20
comment HashSet equals, hashCode are overriden, styl have duplicates
@user1984327 No matter what trick you have planned, your hashcode implementation is wrong. If you have two objects which are equal according to the equals method, the hashcode method must be the same for those objects, or your hashcode implementation is broken. And if you have for example "Bob Smith" and "Bob Johnson", they are equal, but have different hashcodes in your example, which is wrong.
Jan
20
comment How to parse xml file in java?
Sounds like there is something wrong with the prolog in the xml file. If you need help, maybe you should post the prolog of the xml file? And maybe also the java code where you invoke the parse() method.
Jan
20
comment Pretty-printing output from javax.xml.transform.Transformer with only standard java api (Indentation and Doctype positioning)
This answer is based on a misunderstanding of the question. The comment is allowed to be either before or after the doctype declaration. Ie. you can have either xmlDeclaration comment doctypeDeclaration or xmlDeclaration doctypeDeclaration comment. The question never spoke about putting anything before the xmlDeclaration.
Jan
10
comment Unable to pop item from stack
I copied your code, added push implementation and print method and tried pushing {5, 10, 2, 5, 4} and then popping. The result is {5, 10, 2, 5}. I think the error is somewhere else, in code you did not post.
Jan
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
2
comment A Little Confuse on Object and Variable Updating
What is node an instance variable or a local variable in the method doing the deletion? I assume it is a local variable in the method. If that is the case, then you are only modifying the reference, not the object. For example if you do Node someNode = new Node();, you create a new new Node object and the someNode reference points to that new object. If you pass someNode to a method, that method will receive a reference to the same Node object. But changing the reference in that method will not affect the original object, nor the other reference (someNode).
Jan
2
comment Implicit typecasting - Int to double
Try changing the type of either a or b to double. Then, the type casting (of the other operand) will be performed before the division instead.
Dec
27
comment Proper way of declaring an array
While it is correct in the sense that it compiles, this type of declaration violates the official java coding conventions, section 6.1.
Nov
27
comment Finding “islands” of territories on a map recursively
@PeterWalser Looping in a well defined order is possible in the case of a one dimensional map, like in my example. In a two-dimensional case however, this is not possible. What order? It is impossible to have one order which works for all cases. One possible "ordered way" of iterating would be to loop through the x-coordinate first, and then the y coordinate. In the map the OP posted as an example, this would be: 0,0 -> 0,1 -> 0,2 -> 0,3 -> 1,0 -> 1,1 -> 1,2 -> 1,3 -> 2,0 -> 2,1 -> 2,2 -> 2,3. This would create two islands if your algorithm was applied to the red player in the OP:s example.
Nov
26
comment Finding “islands” of territories on a map recursively
This algorithm is not complete. Consider the one dimensional map ABCDE, where each letter represents one hex, and they are aligned in a straight line. Lets say hexes B, C and D belong to player 1. Assume we start "visiting" hex B, and thus we create the first island containing only B, so far. Then, we visit the hex D, conclude that it is not adjacent to B and hence we create a new island, containing only D. Then, we visit C and conclude it is adjacent to B so we add it to that island. Now we have two islands: one containing B and D, and one containing only D.