Reputation
Next tag badge:
395/400 score
158/80 answers
Badges
51 396 685
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~27.9m people reached

2h
comment How to get days and hours until X in ANSI C
Even with a good book or reference, it isn't entirely obvious how to go about the calculation, unless you've spent time messing with calendrical calculations. At 06:00 on Tuesday, is 'next Tuesday at 10:00' all of 7 days and 4 hours ahead, or just 4 hours ahead? It depends on whether that is 'next Tuesday' (and a time which happens to be 10:00) or 'the next occurrence of Tuesday at 10:00'. Presumably, at 16:00 on Tuesday, the next time is 6 days 18 hours ahead. Using standard C, you need to use time(), localtime(), mktime(), and maybe difftime() — I think.
5h
comment Since Linux command cd could not be used as external command, is it possible to write my version of cd (which is not a shell-builtin command)?
@XupengTong: I'd use C, though you could prototype it more quickly, perhaps, in a script. Define the command line interface: chdir directory [command [arg …]] would be what I'd use until I added options. If no command is specified, run an (interactive) shell. Then it is a straight-forward exercise in programming. How would you do it?
5h
revised c99 - error: unknown type name ‘pid_t’
Fix trivial typos
5h
comment c99 - error: unknown type name ‘pid_t’
Note that pid_t is not a standard C data type, so unless you enable extra types somehow, they won't be visible. One way to enable them is to use -std=gnu99 (or -std=gnu11); another is to specify a POSIX or X/Open version to use. I usually use #define _XOPEN_SOURCE 800 (or 700 or 600, depending on platform — see the compilation environment for POSIX.
6h
comment Why is formatting for blocks of text showing up wierd?
Another possibility is that you've got some tabs in the white space sections of the lines. Those might expand differently in your editor compared to the shell.
6h
comment Can someone help me with this awk syntax error
You'll be getting shell syntax errors next; you need a do after a for loop control line and before the done.
6h
comment Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
The terminal driver doesn't send the characters to a program until you type newline (or Control-D). This allows you to edit the line (backspace, etc). So, unless you change the terminal settings, your program gets one line of data each time you hit return. Hence the observed behaviour.
7h
comment How to write a program that fills from the keyboard a two-dimensional table of integers A [3][2]
I'm puzzled about the 'exchanged sizes'. The original question title used A[3][3] (misspelled); the code uses A[3][2] and uses it perfectly correctly. Yes, you can also use A[2][3] (and your code uses that correctly), but that is a different array shape. Only different — but your comment makes it appear that you think the reshaping is crucial for some reason. If you think it is crucial, please elucidate.
7h
revised How to write a program that fills from the keyboard a two-dimensional table of integers A [3][2]
Fix trivial typos
7h
comment Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
Strictly, "if this is fewer than asked for", it means no more than the given data is available at the moment. For example, if a program asks for 1 KiB of data from a terminal but you only type Hi, then there will be 3 bytes read (H, i, and newline), but that doesn't indicate EOF. EOF is indicated when the return value is zero bytes read.
7h
comment Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
Picking nits: the Control-Z or Control-D is an indicator for EOF; the character does not get sent to the program. When you pipe the data, the EOF is indicated when all the data is read and no process can still write to the pipe; again, no character is sent to indicate EOF. In both cases, the read() system call (or one of its many relatives) returns 0 indicating that there is no more data. See Why is EOF recognized only if it is the first character on the line and other related questions.
7h
revised Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
Use <kbd> around control keys and minor edits.
7h
comment Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
Control-C on Linux will (normally) interrupt the program so that the answer is not produced. You should normally type Control-D at the start of a line to indicate EOF. (The 'normally's are there because the keys are configurable.)
7h
comment Why aren't my characters being counted when I enter input via the command line?
You haven't told the program there's no more data (sent it EOF), so it is waiting for more input. You don't print the length for each line; only for the whole file. Since you're probably on a Unix-like machine, you should probably type Control-D at the start of a line to see the final answer. If you type the Control-D part way through the line, you will need to type a second Control-D to indicate EOF.
8h
comment Since Linux command cd could not be used as external command, is it possible to write my version of cd (which is not a shell-builtin command)?
@KeithThompson: There's a /usr/bin/cd on Mac OS X too. I think it exists to meet the requirements of POSIX. cd is not one of the special built-in utilities, so it has to exist as a separate binary.
8h
comment Calculating integer overflow in C
What is the size of long? What is the size of long long? Also, have you looked at and learned from How to detect integer overflow in C or C++??
8h
comment How to use post/pre increment operators in addition problems?
@JohnBode: see update.
8h
revised How to use post/pre increment operators in addition problems?
Adopt some of John Bode's comments
9h
comment Since Linux command cd could not be used as external command, is it possible to write my version of cd (which is not a shell-builtin command)?
Well, I suppose so...it depends in part on your definition of 'external command'...but I recognize that your comment is mostly jocular.
9h
revised Since Linux command cd could not be used as external command, is it possible to write my version of cd (which is not a shell-builtin command)?
Fix trivial typos