5,023 reputation
93485
bio website viltersten.com
location Stockholm, Sweden
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 22 hours ago

Initially, a self taught code monkey since the age of 10 when i got my first computer, the coolest Atari 65XE. Later on, a mathematics and computer science student at a university with a lot of side-studies in philosophy, history, japanese etc. Today, a passionate developer with focus on web related technology from MS.

Motto:
A lousy programmer knows how to create problems.
A good programmer knows how to solve problems.
A great programmer knows how to avoid them. (Get the double meaning?)

Works at: http://kentor.se  
Blogs at: http://konradviltersten.wordpress.com  
Lives at: http://viltersten.somee.com

Dec
20
comment Stop executing C# code
Nice. +1 for clear and comprehensively graded list of alternatives.
Dec
18
awarded  dynamics-crm-2011
Dec
17
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
16
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@LucasTrzesniewski Good call, dude. That was it. Please put it as a reply so I can accept it as an answer. Stupid laziness... :)
Dec
15
revised How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
added 240 characters in body
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@PatrickHofman I can't. I'm bouncing around with some weird legacy stuff that I can't access the source code to. And the person who's developed that is known to be as competent as willing to share the wisdom. Very little, that is. :)
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@PatrickHofman Right, my baaad... Please see the comment to Lucas. It's something less pleasant for the eyes that I get...
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@LucasTrzesniewski Oh, this... My confusion, mate. When I store that into a Type type variable I get this atrocity: {Name = "<ConcatIterator>d__711" FullName = "System.Linq.Enumerable+<ConcatIterator>d__711[[Configurator.Custom, Configurator, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null]]"}
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@LucasTrzesniewski Yeah, my bad for not realizing the ambiguity. Sorry. The type is IEnumerable<Custom> (the bells and whistles cut off for readibility).
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
If I assign hazaa programmatically, it doesn't show in the output file. However, if I edit the value in the debugger "by hand", it gets through to the file. So it's the assignment that fail. Might have to do with the lazy generation but still... Got me confused...
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@LucasTrzesniewski See the edit. The type is IEnumerable, so the laziness might have to do with it...
Dec
15
comment How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
@AdrianoRepetti Custom is a class. As for the type, I though it was implictly obvious. Sorry - my misstake. Updated the question.
Dec
15
revised How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
added 65 characters in body
Dec
15
asked How to affect a property of an element in an IEnumerable?
Dec
12
comment How to open all the closed XML tags in one shot?
Does that apply to Notepad++?
Dec
11
comment How to programmatically click on a node?
This was perfect info. I missed that in wasn't a control. You pointed out where I got mislead and you also explained how I got mislead. It's +1 for the analysis. Also, you need to change your nickname, mate. It doesn't suit you, hehe. Not with replies like this.
Dec
11
accepted How to programmatically click on a node?
Dec
11
revised How to programmatically click on a node?
added 240 characters in body
Dec
11
comment How to programmatically click on a node?
No need. I can update your answer with the weird code I used. Change it if you see it fit. +1 for persistence.
Dec
11
comment How to programmatically click on a node?
My confusion. It does work exactly as you say. I didn't explained the trickery clearly enough. In each of the nodes (referred to as parents) that are reachable by index in your example, I have a set of subnodes (that I referred to as leafs). It's the leafs that need to be programmatically clicked. I can probably go .Nodes[1].Nodes[2] but how do I know which is the currently selected index (the one that got physically clicked by the user)? Do I need to store that value when they actually click? It seems that .SelectedNode already has that value in it...