Reputation
3,036
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
1 9 10
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~168k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 40 votes cast
Feb
1
comment leaking memory and possible malloc error
It is usually a choice of the compiler implementation, not of the machine. I had an old x86 compiler years ago that used all bits 1 for NULL pointers. So in theory, the gcc developers could decide to use it in the next version. Or to use a different NULL representation for each coming version. It would be slightly crazy, but still conforming. However, when confronted with the choice to either save some minor typing or to stay fully portable, I usually prefer the latter.
Jan
31
comment leaking memory and possible malloc error
Don't use calloc or memset to initialize an array of pointers. Use a loop and set each array element to NULL. The binary representation of NULL may be all bits 0 on most systems, but this is not required.
Jan
25
answered 128 bit values on 64 bit architecture in C
Jan
23
answered How to manage memory alignments and generic pointer arithmetics in a portable way in C?
Jan
23
answered “Dictionary” Undeclared
Jan
8
comment Can the ternary operator be expanded into if–else statements in C macros?
@Keith, thanks, I remember. Most of the time I ignore any extensions and write fully portable standard C, though. So in 2 or 3 years I will ask this question again. ;)
Jan
8
comment Can the ternary operator be expanded into if–else statements in C macros?
@Basile: "Sadly"? What would be the value assigned to x in your example? Especially when then condition and the code block can be arbitrary complex and involve more than one variable? What's the final value of int x = while ((j<=10) && (i>=5)) { j++; i--; }?
Dec
12
comment C: how to build up a binary integer
@littleadv: There's nothing wrong with your answer, and I didn't downvote it. As for the loops and switches, such variables usually don't stand for themselves within an application. Just to give some keywords: Debugging dumps, logging, read/write from/to a config, GUI dialog, serialization for network transfer, unit tests, etc. Not to think about changing/extending it later. I find the amount of 30 flags too much for a bit field, because each has to be handled separately each time you need it.
Dec
12
comment C: how to build up a binary integer
A bitfield for 30 flags? You will curse it once you want to loop through them or want to use them with indexed table-based approaches -- because you can't and will end with switch-case cascades.
Dec
7
answered Nested structs and strict aliasing in c
Oct
5
answered what should comment say when programmer is aware that it is bad style but necessary
Oct
3
comment What are the two precondition on Binary search?
Fast is useful, but not necessary. And it is relative, e.g. if you have a very complex compare function that's a magnitude slower than the element access.
Oct
3
answered What are the two precondition on Binary search?
Sep
24
answered Define a macro off of the content of a macro
Sep
22
answered little endian to big endian
Sep
22
comment little endian to big endian
Do you expect us to guess until you say "Yes, I'm doing this"? What is your library doing? What are the errors you get? What have you tried so far to find the source of the errors?
Sep
15
comment how to fix strcpy so that it detects overlapping strings
I have edited my answer with a visualization of case 2.
Sep
15
revised how to fix strcpy so that it detects overlapping strings
added 1355 characters in body
Sep
15
comment how to fix strcpy so that it detects overlapping strings
Correct? I regard to portability, as said, you're invoking undefined behaviour when the two pointers are from different arrays. There's an obvious error, you're using strlen(a), but that's easy to solve. *dest = '\0'; sets the first byte of a, not the last byte. But most importantly, you've missed the case that the strings do not overlap...
Sep
15
comment how to fix strcpy so that it detects overlapping strings
Regarding your edit, as an interviewer my very next question would be: Why would you not rely on memmove, and instead trade a one-liner against an unmaintainable pointer handling mess?