283 reputation
16
bio website
location London, United Kingdom
age 44
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen May 20 at 17:37

Education: Mathematics BA, Theoretical Physics MSc

Interested in philosophy in general - I'd like to understand more about continental and eastern philosophy but have no specific training as such. Not particularly interested in language games or analytic philosophy.

Mills: Life is a problem, not a theorem.

Sextus Empiricus: Slowly grinds the mill of the gods, but it grinds fine.

Blake: When the doors of perception are cleansed, everything will appear as it is, infinite.


Jul
29
awarded  Yearling
Jan
10
comment Why does Haskell have non-strict functions (semantics)?
Yes, I think thats it.
Jan
10
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
10
comment Why does Haskell have non-strict functions (semantics)?
it maybe that the word 'strict' is being used for more that one concept here. In denotational semantics its exactly equivalent to preserving bottom. Whereas I think you're using 'strict' to refer to non-lazy functions. I'll change the question to reflect that.
Jan
10
comment Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
ok,thanks. the article actually answers these questions earlier on.
Jan
10
accepted Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
Jan
10
comment Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
How can an ordering on a poset be 'defined'? Surely this means that the ordering relationship changes in time as more values become defined? Is a semantic domain the same as a type? Why does a non-monotone function solve the halting problem? Does this argument hold if the semantic domain holds only a finite number of values, say Bool? I can see why y<=f x, but I don't see the reverse that y>=f x.
Jan
10
comment Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
interesting. I find it a little odd that strictness may or may not imply constness depending on the underlying implementation of integer. But I suspect that your last example isn't an integer, its just that it can be interpreted as such.
Jan
10
comment Why does Haskell have non-strict functions (semantics)?
I agree that lazy functions are useful. But how does strictness defined in the question allow that?
Jan
10
comment Why does Haskell have non-strict functions (semantics)?
@heatsink:With programming languages in general. I've gathered that non-strictness is something to with laziness but don't understand why.
Jan
10
revised Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
added 91 characters in body
Jan
10
comment Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
Yes, you're right. Thanks.
Jan
10
asked Why is there only one non-strict function from Int to Int?
Jan
10
asked Why does Haskell have non-strict functions (semantics)?
Jan
10
comment Why isn't there a simple syntax for coproduct types in Haskell?
I don't think your edit is quite correct. If types always have bottom, then I suspect that they're actually pointed sets. Products & coproducts in the category of pointed sets differ from the set-theoretical cartesian product & disjoint union. Then coproduct there is the wedge sum. (I'm not so sure about the product, it certainly can't be the smash product as that's not associative).
Jan
10
awarded  Commentator
Jan
10
comment Why isn't there a simple syntax for coproduct types in Haskell?
@n.m.: Why not?
Jan
10
comment Why isn't there a simple syntax for coproduct types in Haskell?
@Dietrich: The obvious syntax is the one Owen pointed out. Is that what you're calling a tagged union?
Jan
10
comment Why isn't there a simple syntax for coproduct types in Haskell?
@Dietrich: What do you mean by saying that (Int,Int) contains undefined? What do you mean by 'contains', I know what it means naively. But theoretically I expect it to be a morphism from the terminal element, but according to that wiki-page it doesn't have that either.
Jan
10
comment Why isn't there a simple syntax for coproduct types in Haskell?
@owen: The other point I noticed is that used 'Either' for the coproduct, as the syntax you & Dietrich pointed out would have been my first guess. What exactly is the status of 'undefined' in the haskell type system, I've only just come across it (I'm more familiar with category theory than I'm with Haskell).