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28
bio website memerocket.com
location Portland, OR
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visits member for 4 years, 11 months
seen May 8 at 17:25

Apr
29
comment does Clojure on Hotspot require any non-FOSS components
Thanks for your answer Stepen. I think the first bullet gets it wrong. HotSpot does not refer to Oracle's distro of Java. I believe in practice Hotspot always refers to a particular VM e.g. oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/index-jsp-136373.html So there is no such thing as a "HotSpot" JDK (mentioned in the second bullet). However, the wikipedia page for OpenJDK says that OpenJDK consists of three parts (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenJDK): the HotSpot VM, the Java class libraries, and javac. So I think the answer to my question is: "yes" since the JCL are part of OpenJDK.
Apr
28
asked does Clojure on Hotspot require any non-FOSS components
Apr
13
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
In your third bullet above you say "the Enumerator constructor is not goneā€¦" I was pointing out that the non-block form is gone (the one that lets you specify an enumeration method other than #each). Thanks again for showing me the way Marc-André!
Apr
12
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
I've had so much trouble with (and learned so much from) #drop(n). Now that I'm returning "plain" Enumerators everywhere I had to sprinkle a few ...lazy.drop(n)... about. So I defined a drop-like method that simply advances the Enumerator, letting me change those to ...skip(n)...
Apr
12
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
You just blew my mind Marc-André. My code just went from idiotic to idiomatic. I did not understand that Ruby wants us to always traffic in Enumerators and not Enumerator::Lazy. Wherever we need something to be lazy we ask that enumerator for the #lazy version. The downside perhaps is that users of our abstractions really have to understand when to call #lazy (e.g. before calling #drop(n)). The upside is crisp clean code.
Apr
12
accepted What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
Apr
12
awarded  Scholar
Apr
12
asked What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Essentially, any old (pre 1.9) Enumerable method that did not take a block, could not be "upgraded" to return an Enumerator since there was no way for the caller to signal it wanted an Enumerator back. Enumerable#take and #drop don't take blocks so they could not be made to return Enumerators. Though of course Enumerator::Lazy#take and #drop do return Enumerators as expected.
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Thanks fmendez. Yep, I totally assumed (wrongly) that #take and #drop would return Enumerators. Now I understand why that would be bad. Lots of code relies on those returning Arrays.
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Thank you Marc-André. But there is no Enumerable#lazy in Ruby 1.9.3. That's only available in 2.0. I think one of my key misunderstandings was in assuming that #drop returned an Enumerator at all. For some reason, while both #drop and #take have trivial Enumerator implementations possible, neither returns an Enumerator at all! Even the fix for Ruby Bug #7715 "Lazy enumerators should want to stay lazy" fails to fix those. Come to think of it, those cannot be "fixed" since doing so would break code that relies on those returning Arrays!
Apr
10
awarded  Student
Apr
10
asked why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Apr
8
answered Ruby: Is there something like Enumerable#drop that returns an enumerator instead of an array?
Apr
7
comment Ruby: Is there something like Enumerable#drop that returns an enumerator instead of an array?
Wouldn't it be more like: ...with_index(n){|val,idx| yield val}...
Dec
10
awarded  Critic
Jun
4
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Answer
May
20
answered Rails console running incredibly slowly when editing text
Mar
29
answered Is there a BDD framework for testing Javascript that uses Gherkin DSL?