276 reputation
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bio website memerocket.com
location Portland, OR
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visits member for 5 years, 3 months
seen Nov 14 at 23:18

Jun
21
comment Where does Ruby keep track of its open file descriptors?
I wonder if a (Ruby) child process (i.e. after a fork) will see File objects for each of the (inherited) open file descriptors.
May
10
comment Traversing to a specific child element with Prototype
@Panique just replace #example with .example
May
6
comment does Clojure on Hotspot require any non-FOSS components
Agreed. Knowing that the whole JCL is Open Source, there wouldn't be any reason to subset it. On the other hand, it would be interesting to know which Java classes are actually necessary. That might be an interesting subject for a different stackoverflow question :)
May
6
comment Enumerator#each Restarts Sequence
Would this be even a little better: class Enumerator; def each_remaining; return enum_for(__method__) unless block_given?; loop{ yield self.next};end;end
May
6
comment Enumerator#each Restarts Sequence
Thanks for pointing out that documentation @AaronK. I had read that but you made me read it again and now I understand it. I still think it's wrong for Enumerator#each to fail to take into account the Enumerator state. I would be happier if the behavior and the doc changed :)
May
6
comment Enumerator#each Restarts Sequence
@NeilSlater I expect #each to take the Enumerator state into account because, well, it's a method on the Enumerator. I am surprised that the Enumerator#each is essentially giving me the same behavior as the original Object's #each did.
May
6
comment Mapreduce Table Diff
From looking at all the solutions I wonder whether it's better to use the canned CoGroup and maybe some redundant filtering or whether it's better to hand-craft a solution that writes to the MultipleOutputs on the fly.
May
6
comment Mapreduce Table Diff
I wonder how @Engineiro's solution (using CoGroup) would compare to this solution performance-wise.
May
6
comment Mapreduce Table Diff
This looks pretty close to an actual solution. CoGroup is just the magic outer join thingie I need! It makes me wonder what the performance of CoGroup is and whether it can benefit from the fact that my tables are pre-sorted.
May
6
comment Mapreduce Table Diff
That was helpful, and I think I get the gist. But you assume some MR knowledge I don't possess. In particular, I don't know exactly how to "Append" and then to "merge" as you suggest early on.
Apr
29
comment does Clojure on Hotspot require any non-FOSS components
Thanks for the clarifications Stephen. Remaining nit: second bullet still refers to the "Java 7 Hotspot JDK" which is not a thing. Your stance that all the Java SE libs (JCL) are required is reasonable nevertheless it would be interesting to know which subset of those are actually required to make all of Clojure work. Lastly the point of referencing wikipedia was merely to inform myself and others as to what comprised the OpenJDK (JVM(hotspot),JCL,javac).
Apr
29
comment does Clojure on Hotspot require any non-FOSS components
Thanks for your answer Stepen. I think the first bullet gets it wrong. HotSpot does not refer to Oracle's distro of Java. I believe in practice Hotspot always refers to a particular VM e.g. oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/index-jsp-136373.html So there is no such thing as a "HotSpot" JDK (mentioned in the second bullet). However, the wikipedia page for OpenJDK says that OpenJDK consists of three parts (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenJDK): the HotSpot VM, the Java class libraries, and javac. So I think the answer to my question is: "yes" since the JCL are part of OpenJDK.
Apr
13
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
In your third bullet above you say "the Enumerator constructor is not goneā€¦" I was pointing out that the non-block form is gone (the one that lets you specify an enumeration method other than #each). Thanks again for showing me the way Marc-André!
Apr
12
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
I've had so much trouble with (and learned so much from) #drop(n). Now that I'm returning "plain" Enumerators everywhere I had to sprinkle a few ...lazy.drop(n)... about. So I defined a drop-like method that simply advances the Enumerator, letting me change those to ...skip(n)...
Apr
12
comment What's the best way to return an Enumerator::Lazy when your class doesn't define #each?
You just blew my mind Marc-André. My code just went from idiotic to idiomatic. I did not understand that Ruby wants us to always traffic in Enumerators and not Enumerator::Lazy. Wherever we need something to be lazy we ask that enumerator for the #lazy version. The downside perhaps is that users of our abstractions really have to understand when to call #lazy (e.g. before calling #drop(n)). The upside is crisp clean code.
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Essentially, any old (pre 1.9) Enumerable method that did not take a block, could not be "upgraded" to return an Enumerator since there was no way for the caller to signal it wanted an Enumerator back. Enumerable#take and #drop don't take blocks so they could not be made to return Enumerators. Though of course Enumerator::Lazy#take and #drop do return Enumerators as expected.
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Thanks fmendez. Yep, I totally assumed (wrongly) that #take and #drop would return Enumerators. Now I understand why that would be bad. Lots of code relies on those returning Arrays.
Apr
11
comment why does Enumerator include Enumerable
Thank you Marc-André. But there is no Enumerable#lazy in Ruby 1.9.3. That's only available in 2.0. I think one of my key misunderstandings was in assuming that #drop returned an Enumerator at all. For some reason, while both #drop and #take have trivial Enumerator implementations possible, neither returns an Enumerator at all! Even the fix for Ruby Bug #7715 "Lazy enumerators should want to stay lazy" fails to fix those. Come to think of it, those cannot be "fixed" since doing so would break code that relies on those returning Arrays!
Apr
7
comment Ruby: Is there something like Enumerable#drop that returns an enumerator instead of an array?
Wouldn't it be more like: ...with_index(n){|val,idx| yield val}...
Dec
4
comment 'column “id” does not exist' error while trying to associate a Role with a User using rails-authorization
BTW this problem with composite_primary_keys is well-known and a patch is available for two full years. Unfortunately the patch hasn't been rolled into the gem. groups.google.com/group/compositekeys/browse_thread/thread/…