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Feb
21
comment Loose Coupling Presenter to View in MVP
Interestingly, my manager's model would simplify certain cases. If the view needs to enter a mode that includes changing the enabled state of controls and changing the data in a table (perhaps we're changing the filtering mode), then in my model the view has to tell the presenter to update the data and to tell the view to change modes, or worse, it changes mode itself hoping the presenter will change the data. In his model, the view controls all of that, just asking the presenter for the data for the new mode.
Jan
23
accepted Loose Coupling Presenter to View in MVP
Jan
21
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
@VladimirDyuzhev: you're making a good point there. But interestingly you could declare your method with throws Foo<Bar>. If you think about it, when declaring a specific type parameter you promise to the compiler that you will use only the right kind of objects at runtime. You do this today with List<Bar> and all. And even today, you could mismatch a List<Bar> with a List<Baz> in a variety of ways (oops, ClassCastException). Managing your generic types comes with the territory. It's just syntactic sugar for casting, right? And you can also skip the promises, by using Foo<?>.
Jan
21
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
This is a much better argument than the statement "you can't catch Ex<foo> and Ex<Bar> in the same context". But example: a framework that can manage objects from an entire domain model generically might throw a generic exception class ValidationException<T>. A generic exception handler might want to catch ValidationException<?>, but more specific handlers might know the type and use ValidationException<UserPreferences>. The way things are today, I may have to cast explicitly (and lose the syntax sugar). Anyway, like I said, this sounds like a much better argument than the other ones.
Jan
21
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
You insist that support for generics inside exception classes would require runtime generics by showing us a very contrived example using standard exception classes. If Java supported generic exceptions -- and it's obvious to me that it was in fact theoretically possible to support these -- we would have used the generic type parameters for more mundane things. You have to start seeing generics for what they are: syntactic sugar with some support from the compiler for finding type mismatch errors. No bearing on the runtime. Nobody said that core exception classes would have to change either.
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java allow generic subclasses of Throwable?
@ViliamBúr: nonetheless, the same risk is present today with things like process(List<Integer>): it could accidentally process a List of Strings, especially when you start putting frameworks like Spring in between the caller and the callee, or when interfacing with non-generified clients, and the list goes on. So then, by this argument, why didn't we disallow generics in method arguments as well?
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java allow generic subclasses of Throwable?
@TorstenMarek: If one calls myList.get(i), obviously get still returns an Object. Does the compiler insert a cast to A in order to capture some of the constraint at runtime? If not, the OP is right that in the end it boils down to Objects at runtime. (The class file certainly contains metadata about A, but it's only metadata AFAIK.)
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
Thanks for acknowledging the weakness in the "clash after type erasure" argument -- I feel it's being too easily accepted as the reason for the limitation so I took it upon myself to fight it. Of course, this also means that the accepted answer is also misleading and should probably be corrected.
Jan
19
revised Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
small clarifications
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
Heads up for alternatives. You can also have generic methods inside your exception class. As in @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") public <T> T getObject() { return (T) object; }.
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
... The same could have been done with catch blocks: allow catch(MyException<String>) unless I also add a catch(MyException<Integer>).
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
The argument that erasure could lead to clashes if two catch blocks erased to the same type seems flawed to me -- see my answer. You could still allow generics in catch blocks and generate a compiler error if and when two catch blocks erased to the same type. The compiler does this today for method arguments: if you write void process(List<String>) {}, the compiler doesn't complain -- it just erases it to process(List). If you add a sibling that reads void process(List<Object>) {}, the compiler suddenly generates an error. (continued in next comment)
Jan
19
revised Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
clarified wording to call out current limitations of generics
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
I believe your premise is flawed. Why would catch (Foo<Bar> ex) need to be interpreted as if (ex instanceof Foo<Bar>)? The compiler could perform type erasure, and the runtime would interpret the catch as if (ex instanceof Foo). Runtime would work just like today, but we would have better compile time support thanks to generic exceptions. Of course, it would be impossible to catch both Foo<Bar> and Foo<Baz> in the same context, but that's OK: it's just as bad with method arguments today, since you can't have both foo(List<String>) and foo(List<Object>) in the same context.
Jan
19
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
I'm saying the exact same thing in my answer. I'm also saying that this is not a reason to disallow generic exceptions. It's a reason to disallow catch blocks that erase to the same type, but that's about it.
Jan
16
revised Loose Coupling Presenter to View in MVP
added 325 characters in body
Jan
16
revised Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
added second rebuttal
Jan
16
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
See my answer for a rebuttal of this answer. Also, backward compatibility concerns did not prevent them from allowing generics in other contexts. You don't hear anyone complain that List can't be generified because we need to preserve backward compatibility. What you do hear is that generics get erased during the process called type erasure in order to preserve backward compatibility. The same could have been done for exceptions.
Jan
16
comment Why doesn't Java support generic Throwables?
Sorry, but I can't wrap my mind around the argument in the JLS. It's as if this statement forgets that the compiler performs type erasure, effectively removing the generics by the time the JVM uses its catch mechanism. So how is it necessary to avoid syntactic sugar if that syntactic sugar would have no impact on runtime anyway because it will be removed? And with this slippery slope, why not disallow other examples like the ones in my own anser below? I mean, the JVM doesn't support generics in those contexts either, yet they are allowed in source code. :)