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bio website uptoisomorphism.com
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seen Jul 15 at 18:04

C. McCann

Stack Overflow Janitorial Reserve Corps junior member since Nov. 5 '10 -- "Putting the 'SO' in 'SO CLEAN!'"

Don't rag and riposte, just flag that post! -- Getting involved when things become non-constructive or off-topic isn't likely to be productive. Flags are there to help you help the moderators help us all.

Remember... only you can prevent bad posting.


I can occasionally be found indulging in general frivolity at #haskell, haskell-cafe, Reddit, Lambda the Ultimate, and probably other places.


"If you want more effective programmers, you will discover that they should not waste their time debugging, they should not introduce the bugs to start with." -- EWD

"The utility of a language as a tool of thought increases with the range of topics it can treat, but decreases with the amount of vocabulary and the complexity of grammatical rules which the user must keep in mind. Economy of notation is therefore important." -- K. Iverson

"Civilization advances by extending the number of operations which we can perform without thinking about them." -- A. N. Whitehead

Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.


May
4
comment What am I doing wrong with this meant-to-be-trivial higher rank polymorphism exercise?
@Steve314: Yep. Anything you can write as a top-level polymorphic definition could make sense here. The only defined value with type forall a. [a] is [], but forall a. [a] -> [a] could be a whole bunch of things, such as reverse, cycle, drop 3, const []... The key point here is that with rank2c or rank2d, both the choice of a type a and some value with that type are given as arguments. In your original rank2, only the type was an "argument" but it expected an output of that type anyway.
May
3
comment Why doesn't GHC Haskell support overloaded record parameter names?
@Evi1M4chine: Perhaps you should read some of the copious existing discussions on the issue before proposing something that doesn't actually work very well and then demanding that other people implement it.
May
3
comment Show basic arithmetic functions as string
@isturdy: You could check functions of type Int -> Int -> Int for extensional equality easily enough. You just need to apply both functions to all possible arguments and check that they produce the same result! It might take a while, though.
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
@Joodoo: Oh, good grief. In that case: Learn You a Haskell if you like silly illustrations, Real World Haskell if you don't, and/or The Gentle Introduction which is no-nonsense and not actually very gentle. All three are available for free online, and at least the first two can be bought in dead tree format. LYAH seems to be most popular these days, and RWH may be slightly dated in some of its examples.
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
@Joodoo: Fortunately, other people were far more patient and helpful than I. My apologies as well for being so brusque. That said, as nice as dblhelix's answer is, there is material for learning Haskell that's at least as good already available on the internet, and your questions will likely be better received if you consult those first before asking here. If this is coursework of some sort, are you using a textbook, and if so what is it?
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
@Joodoo: Really, it compiled despite at least one syntax error, probably two names not in scope, and what would be a type error if the other problems were fixed? And yes, it is entirely possible to test, even if you don't know, and didn't try to figure out, how to do so.
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
Stack Overflow does not exist to be your compiler. Compile the code, read the errors, and fix any you can. If you have specific questions, then come ask for help.
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
Verifying whether your list of addresses compiles and produces the right answer should be entirely self-contained and not need the rest of the code to test. From what I can see your code has multiple type and even syntax errors, so it's clear you've not tried anything yourself.
May
3
comment Haskell Defining a List and List Comprehension
Surely you can tell whether it's completely wrong or not by simply trying it and seeing if it works?
May
3
comment Monitoring GHC activity
In my experience, GHC going into an infinite loop can be recognized because anything productive it would be doing that slowly generally makes it eat lots of memory as well...
May
2
comment Type Families extension does not work as described
@Dylan: 7.6.3 was a bugfix release. The next significant version will be 7.8.1, which should include this feature and is planned for release late this year.
Apr
29
comment Why does this Haskell statement not evaluate lazily?
@aleator: A feature which is newer than this post, I believe. I shudder to think how many of my answers are now silly in light of newer GHC features and libraries.
Apr
26
comment Anything wrong with my Fisher-Yates shuffle?
Are you perhaps timing the algorithm without actually forcing the entire result to be evaluated?
Apr
25
comment GADT's failed exhaustiveness checking
The best part is how adding fun (Inl Foo) = ... is a type error. Man, you just can't catch a break! (but using _ works, of course)
Apr
25
comment How come I can write the first version but not the second?
What do you expect the expression ((+ x) [1..5]) to do?
Apr
25
comment Risks of using unsafeperformIO on randomIO
@leftaroundabout: Well, that quicksort itself isn't random then, is it? It's as pure as runST, there's just no easy way to enforce it the way ST does. The random values are still "locally" impure, though.
Apr
25
comment Recursive set union: how does it work really?
@posdef: Because at every point, it can turn the input into multiple smaller trees and a single element. The union of the smaller trees is done recursively, then the single element is inserted. The recursive "smaller trees" process stops when the smaller trees are empty. All the real logic is in the insertion here.
Apr
24
comment What are the advantages of Cons?
Actually, the OP seems to be using "cons" in a way typical in the ML tradition of functional programming, where the term "data constructor" would be correct. In that context, the data constructor simultaneously serves as the definition of a "cons cell", the operation that creates one, and the pattern used to extract the head and tail of an existing list. Also, in these languages it is usually exclusive to lists, rather than the all-purpose building block cons cells are in lisps.
Apr
24
comment Haskell parsec prefix operator issue
@ocharles: The means "proves that" or "therefore", sort of a meta-implication. It's called a turnstile. The ∀x. x is "forall x, x", which is the most general type of undefined and only true/an inhabited type in an inconsistent logic/Turing-complete language. To quote roconnor on IRC, "cmccann is saying that if everything is inhabited, then whatever nonsense he is about to write follows." Look up "Curry-Howard correspondence" if you don't know what logic has to do with types. :]
Apr
24
comment Haskell parsec prefix operator issue
@kvanberendonck: Possibly. I'm not terribly familiar with it, though.