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Apr
29
comment Why does this Haskell statement not evaluate lazily?
@aleator: A feature which is newer than this post, I believe. I shudder to think how many of my answers are now silly in light of newer GHC features and libraries.
Apr
26
comment Anything wrong with my Fisher-Yates shuffle?
Are you perhaps timing the algorithm without actually forcing the entire result to be evaluated?
Apr
25
comment GADT's failed exhaustiveness checking
The best part is how adding fun (Inl Foo) = ... is a type error. Man, you just can't catch a break! (but using _ works, of course)
Apr
25
comment How come I can write the first version but not the second?
What do you expect the expression ((+ x) [1..5]) to do?
Apr
25
comment Risks of using unsafeperformIO on randomIO
@leftaroundabout: Well, that quicksort itself isn't random then, is it? It's as pure as runST, there's just no easy way to enforce it the way ST does. The random values are still "locally" impure, though.
Apr
25
comment Recursive set union: how does it work really?
@posdef: Because at every point, it can turn the input into multiple smaller trees and a single element. The union of the smaller trees is done recursively, then the single element is inserted. The recursive "smaller trees" process stops when the smaller trees are empty. All the real logic is in the insertion here.
Apr
24
comment What are the advantages of Cons?
Actually, the OP seems to be using "cons" in a way typical in the ML tradition of functional programming, where the term "data constructor" would be correct. In that context, the data constructor simultaneously serves as the definition of a "cons cell", the operation that creates one, and the pattern used to extract the head and tail of an existing list. Also, in these languages it is usually exclusive to lists, rather than the all-purpose building block cons cells are in lisps.
Apr
24
comment Haskell parsec prefix operator issue
@ocharles: The means "proves that" or "therefore", sort of a meta-implication. It's called a turnstile. The ∀x. x is "forall x, x", which is the most general type of undefined and only true/an inhabited type in an inconsistent logic/Turing-complete language. To quote roconnor on IRC, "cmccann is saying that if everything is inhabited, then whatever nonsense he is about to write follows." Look up "Curry-Howard correspondence" if you don't know what logic has to do with types. :]
Apr
24
comment Haskell parsec prefix operator issue
@kvanberendonck: Possibly. I'm not terribly familiar with it, though.
Apr
22
comment Why cant i define a constant and than use it in a function in Haskell?
If one wants to be deliberately obtuse, it's possible to argue that polymorphic values are implicitly functions whose first argument is a type... :]
Apr
20
comment What is this special functor structure called?
@SjoerdVisscher: I couldn't convince myself of that for infinite structures. For finite fixed-size collections, certainly.
Apr
20
comment What is this special functor structure called?
@PéterDiviánszky: Regarding just the first two laws, my guess is that 1 implies 2 and that those alone give you a representable functor. Adding the third law only constrains the implementation of Applicative and Monad to also behave like Reader. That is, 1 and 2 mean the functor is isomorphic to Reader, but the Applicative instance may not be.
Apr
20
comment What is this special functor structure called?
@PéterDiviánszky: Sorry, those are my own terms, I don't think there are standard ones that mean what I want. Basically the "parametric portion" of a functor is whatever the type parameter is, like the elements of a list or result of a function, and the "shape" is any other portion that varies between values, like the length and element order of a list or the mapping from function inputs to outputs.
Apr
20
comment An example of a type with kind * -> * which cannot be an instance of Functor
Operator sections aren't allowed with types last I checked, so (-> Int) is not valid syntax. Even if it were allowed, it would have to be treated as a partially-applied type synonym and thus couldn't be used for an instance without a wrapper type anyway. As an abuse of notation it makes perfect sense, though.
Apr
20
comment What does “coalgebra” mean in the context of programming?
@Anthony: I'll have to take a look at the paper because I'm really not seeing the connection immediately. I gather that's only talking about the additive fragment of linear logic?
Apr
19
comment Global variables in Haskell
Or inits from Data.List...
Apr
19
comment Type enforced “strict/imperitive” subset/version of Haskell
Have you seen the Disciple language?
Apr
18
comment How to concisely express function iteration?
@benw: Sure, it would reduce the number of (.)s to evaluate, just like with the exponentiation. If you compile a highly contrived example without optimizations you might even be able to measure the performance difference!
Apr
18
comment What does “coalgebra” mean in the context of programming?
@Anthony: The only thing called 'polycategories' that I know of doesn't seem to have any relevance here. Could you clarify what connection you're seeing?
Apr
18
comment Generic Trie Haskell implementation
@kosmikus: Of course, but emphasis on "near". You don't need much, but a trie that's completely polymorphic with no class constraint isn't going to happen.